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Clara Soper
03-26-2001, 01:58 PM
I recently requested information on Swivel Football Boot design though
Biomch-L. Here is a summary of the replies I received. My original
question can be found at the end.

Thanks to all those who replied,

Clara Soper
Lecturer
PhD Candidate
School of Community Health and Sport Studies
Auckland University of Technology
Private Bag 92006
Auckland, New Zealand
Tel: (+649) 917 9999 xtn 7848
Fax: (+649) 917 9960
Email: clara.soper@aut.ac.nz

__________________________________________________ _______________
Dr. Neal Smith, Lecturer In Sports Biomechanics, University College
Chichester

....... as far as i am aware, the reason the boot did not go
into production was on the basis of safety grounds from the sports
governing
body. In other words, they thought that the design may cause
laceration
injuries to other players during tackles.

__________________________________________________ _______________
Russell Best

A similar boot has recently been developed in Australia (a soccer
boot and
a court shoe). I did some very basic testing for the developers. I
believe
the current owners of the concept are SFIDA in Australia. I don't
know
what they are doing with it now.

I don't think there was any follow up to the US study.

__________________________________________________ _______________
E C "Ned" Frederick, PhD, Exeter Research, Inc.

I have only indirect knowledge about the "Hanley heel" or the later
swivel design. My understanding is that it was shown to be safer, but

that the performance compromises were too great. In other words
players did not want to wear these boots because of their bulk,
excess weight and perhaps their extra heel lift.

The original execution of the design clearly needed improvements, but

to my knowledge, no one has undertaken a redesign of this basic
"slipping disk" concept. The concentric ring arrangement of the
"blades" cleats in the early 90's were an attempt to achieve a
similar protective result with fewer performance compromises, but
without the disk mechanism.

I suggest you research the patent databases for further details on
this approach to protecting the knee in turf sports. This has been an

active area over the last 20 years.




__________________________________________________ _______________
Hi everyone,

A paper was published in 1973 by Cameron and Davis in the Journal of
Sports Medicine which reports about the successful design and testing
of a swivel football boot. In order to reduce the risk of knee and
ankle injuries due to foot fixation in American football, the authors
designed a shoe which had a swivel plate on the sole. The plate had
four cleats mounted on it and required at least 10 lb of torque to
initiate movement. The boot was tested on 466 players and was found
to be 3x more safer than ordinary football boots. Additionally the
swivel football boot did not significantly affect performance.

I have been trying to locate further information on this boot but
have come up with nothing. If anyone knows of where I can find more
information about the study by Cameron and Davis I would appreciate
your assistance. I am not sure why this boot is not available today
with the advancement in technology over the last 25 years. Is it
because the athletes/coaches/trainers didn't like it? If so, what
didn't they like about it?

Thank you for time,
Clara Soper




Clara Soper
Lecturer
PhD Candidate
School of Community Health and Sport Studies
Auckland University of Technology
Private Bag 92006
Auckland, New Zealand
Tel: (+649) 917 9999 xtn 7848
Fax: (+649) 917 9960
Email: clara.soper@aut.ac.nz

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