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Herman J. Woltring
10-09-1989, 08:12 AM
Dear BIOMCH-L reader,

Below a number of items from MEDNEWS@ASUACAD.BITNET that might interest you,
followed by an announcement about file distribution via BIOMCH-L.

Herman J. Woltring, Eindhoven/Netherlands

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From: Health InfoCom Network News
Volume 2, Number 33 September 11, 1989

Items from Medical News for Week Ending September 11, 1989
Copyright 1989 - USA TODAY/Gannett National Information Network
Reproduced with Permission

BONE-MASS LINKED TO FRACTURES:

The amount of bone mass in the forearm's radius predicts future fractures,
says a new study published in the Sept. 1 issue of Annals of Internal
Medicine. In a group of more than 500 women, a single measurement of bone mass
in the radius was related to the non-spine fractures. A slight decline in bone
mass could increase fracture risk by 120 percent, the study says.

RESEARCHERS MAKING TOUGH TEETH:

By borrowing technology from the auto industry, dental researchers at the
University of Florida are trying to make false teeth, crowns and other ceramic
dental appliances tougher by exposing them to a heat-tempering process used to
make car windshields shatter-resistant. The technique makes dental porcelain
disks crack-, chip- and fracture-resistant.

FISH KEEPS HEART HEALTHY:

After studying 852 men in the Dutch town of Zutphen, Greenland, over a 20-
year period, scientists conclude that consumption of as little as one or two
fish dishes per week might help prevent coronary disease, says an article in
the September issue of consumer Reports Health Letter.

[The Dutch get astray easily --- HJW]

FISH OIL PREVENTS CLOTTING:

Studies show that high doses of omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish oils,
interfere with clotting by making blood platelets less sticky. Thus, the
platelets don't form clots, which in coronary arteries triggers most heart
attacks, says an article in the September issue of Consumer Reports Health
Letter.

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From: Health InfoCom Network News
Volume 2, Number 34 September 17, 1989

Items from Medical News for Week Ending September 17, 1989
Copyright 1989 - USA TODAY/Gannett National Information Network
Reproduced with Permission

STRESS TEST ISN'T FOR EVERYONE:

If you feel fine, you're exercising regularly and your checkups indicate
you're not at high risk for coronary heart disease, having an exercise stress
test isn't for you, reports Health Letter. Consumers Union's medical
consultants said an exercise stress test - also called a treadmill test - can
cost more in time, money and worry than its worth.

PROTONS BATTLE CANCER:

The first proton-beam accelerator built specifically for hospital use will
be unveiled in October at Loma Linda University Medical Center, near Los
Angeles. The machine uses magnetic resonance imaging to help target its beams.
The proton-beam accelerator is a cancer sharpshooter, killing diseased cells
while leaving healthy ones unharmed, reports Health Letter.

LAZY PEOPLE COST SOCIETY MONEY:

A new study shows that when you don't exercise regularly, you hurt not only
your own health but society's pocketbook as well. The RAND Corp. study showed
an average social cost of $1,900 a year in higher insurance rates and extra
sick leave for the sixth of the American adult population that could exercise
regularly and does not.

BLOOD-WASHING USED FOR MS:

Some patients with multiple sclerosis that occurs in periodic episodes have
benefited by adding filtration of blood plasma to standard drug treatments,
according to a new study. Filtering antibodies from plasma reduces that attack
and shows better results than seen in 57 patients in the study who received
only drugs to suppress their immune systems.

CARTILAGE TRANSPLANT WORKED:

A cartilage transplant, a new surgical procedure developed to alleviate
pain and return mobility to a knee affected by degenerative arthritis, was
recently successfully performed at Baptist Hospital East, Memphis, Tenn. The
surgery was performed by orthopedic surgeon Randal Holcomb, M.D.

PROBE SENSES TEMPERATURES:

Trimedyne, Inc. has filled an application with the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration for approval to market its Laserprobe temperature sensing
catheters for use in peripheral (leg) vessels. The devices monitor and adjust
the amount of laser energy to provide the precise temperature needed to remove
plaque from blood vessels.

ARTHRITIS DRUG SHOWS PROMISE:

A new drug is showing promise in reducing the pain and joint swelling
suffered by rheumatoid arthritis patients. Research at the University of Miami
finds no side effects to the drug amilprilose hydrochloride. The drug still
needs further study, according to the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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