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Steve Cowin
11-05-2001, 10:00 AM
This message was sent yesterday, but the date incorrect date 10/24
appeared in the title rather than the correct date of 11/7, so it is
being resent with this error corrected.

To Bone Researchers in the NYC area:
The NYC mineralized tissue seminar will have its second
seminar in its new millennium series on Wednesday night this week
November 7th. The speaker is Haviva M. Goldman, Ph.D. Assistant
Professor of Anthropology and Archaeology at the Brooklyn College,
CUNY. She will speak on THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HETEROGENEITY IN THE
MICROSTRUCTURAL AND GEOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF HUMAN BONE. An abstract
of this talk and a description of her research interests are given
below. The same information on the other fall seminar speakers is
posted on www.bonenet.net and will be circulated as the date of each
seminar approaches.

Speaker: Haviva M. Goldman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Anthropology
and Archaeology at the Brooklyn College, CUNY

Title: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HETEROGENEITY IN THE MICROSTRUCTURAL AND
GEOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF HUMAN BONE

Abstract: Despite extensive research into the effects of aging on
bone tissue properties, gaps remain in our knowledge of the causes
and extent of heterogeneity in the material (i.e. histological
composition) and structural (i.e. geometric shape) properties of
bone. As such information is important both for elucidating the
relationship between bone structure and its functional adaptation,
and for understanding the etiology of age-related diseases such as
osteoporosis, a detailed study documenting this variability within
the mid-shaft femur of a large, well-documented autopsy sample was
undertaken.
Collagen fiber orientation and mineralization density are two aspects
of a bone's microstructure that are known to influence the mechanical
properties of bone. Although their spatial distributions have been
hypothesized to reflect loading during life, their variability within
an adult sample is relatively unknown. Using circularly polarized
light and backscattered electron microscopy it was possible to obtain
images of entire femoral cross-sections that could be examined with
respect to these two variables. By also calculating measures of
cross-sectional geometry, it was possible to provide information
about the regularity of bending loads at the femoral mid-shaft that
could be examined relative to the microstructural organization.
Extensive variability characterized each of these properties, such
that it was not possible to identify a single pattern of
microstructural organization for the human mid-shaft femur, even
within a single age or sex group. In addition, despite an average
coincidence between microstructural organization and predicted
bending forces at the mid-shaft, the vast majority of individuals in
this sample show no relationship among these variables. These
results indicate that these variables act somewhat independently,
resulting in different optimal configurations that may reflect an
individual's unique life history. The implications of these results
for studies of human bone biology are discussed from both an
anthropological and biomechanical perspective.

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF HAVIVA GOLDMAN: Haviva recently completed her
doctorate in Anthropology through the CUNY Graduate Center (as part
of the New York Consortium of Evolutionary Primatology (NYCEP)
Graduate Program in Anthropology). Her dissertation research focused
on intra-population variability in microstructural and geometric
properties of the human mid-shaft femur with age and sex. The
project stemmed from an interest in applying histological research to
studies of functional adaptation of past (archaeological and fossil)
human populations and in better understanding the processes of human
variability in skeletal aging. She will continue to pursue her
interests in bone biology, extending her research to include a
variety of modern and archaeological human population samples, as
well as addressing issues of growth and development by studying
variability in bone microstructure in juvenile bone as well.

NOTE: PRIOR TO HAVIVA GOLDMAN'S SEMINAR THERE WILL BE A SHORT
PRESENTATION TO PROFESSOR MELVIN MOSS OF COLUMBIA P & S IN
RECOGNITION AND APPRECIATION FOR HIS BEING THE CREATIVE SPIRIT AND
EFFORT DRIVING THE PUBLIC SEMINAR SERIES ON MINERALIZED TISSUE
RESEARCH (THE BONE AND TOOTH CLUB) IN TRANSITIONAL YEARS.

WHERE AND WHEN: The seminar series is to be held this Fall in room
3309 at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center (GC)
on Wednesdays from 7 to 8:30 PM. There will be some socializing
before the seminar in the GC snack bar on the first floor, the 365
Express.

TRAVEL TO THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK (CUNY) GRADUATE CENTER (GC)

The Graduate Center (GC) of the City University of New York
(CUNY) is located in the newly renovated Altman Building at 365 5th
Avenue. The Altman Building occupies a city block bounded by 35th and
34th street on the north and south, respectively, and by Madison
Avenue and 5th Avenue and on the east and west, respectively. The
Altman Building is catty-corner from the Empire State Building. The
GC shares this building with the Science Division of the New York
Public Library and Oxford University Press. The entrance to the GC is
on 5th Avenue between, and almost equidistant from, East 34th Street
and East 35th Street.
--

************************************
Phone (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
Fax (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
Please note that my old fax number at home [(212) 787-3757] is no
longer active.
Phone (212) 650-5208 (Work)
Email


IMPORTANT, PLEASE NOTE
NEW (2001) PREFERRED MAILING ADDRESS
Stephen C. Cowin
2166 Broadway
Apartment 12D
New York, NY 10024

The phone number and zip code are unchanged.

WORK ADDRESS:
Stephen C. Cowin
Director, New York Center for Biomedical Engineering
School of Engineering
The City College
138th Street and Convent Avenue
New York, NY 10031-9198, U. S. A.
*************************************

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