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View Full Version : NEW YORK CITY BONE SEMINAR, Thursday night,January 31st. Mitch Schaffler will speak ON MECHANICAL FACTORSAND REMODELING OF COMPACT BONE.



Steve Cowin
01-26-2002, 10:52 AM
To Bone Researchers in the NYC area:
The NYC mineralized tissue seminar will have its first
seminar in the Spring 2002 series on Thursday night, January 31st.
The speaker is Mitch Schaffler, Professor of Orthopaedics, Cell
Biology and Anatomy & Director of Orthopaedic Research, Department of
Orthopaedics, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He will speak on
MECHANICAL FACTORS AND REMODELING OF COMPACT BONE. An abstract of
this talk and a description of Mitch's research interests are given
below. The same information on the other spring seminar speakers is
posted on www.bonenet.net and will be circulated as the date of each
seminar approaches.

Speaker: Mitchell B. Schaffler, Ph.D., Professor of Orthopaedics,
Cell Biology and Anatomy & Director of Orthopaedic Research,
Department of Orthopaedics, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine and
Co-Director, New York Center for Biomedical Engineering, City College
of New York

Title: MECHANICAL FACTORS AND REMODELING OF COMPACT BONE

Abstract: Skeletal tissues maintain a balance between mechanical wear
and tear (i.e. fatigue) damage and intrinsic, matrix-level repair.
Imbalance in this damage-repair homeostasis, either because of
excessively rapid damage accumulation or because of ineffective,
inadequate or inappropriate biological responses to chronic injury,
leads to pathology and, ultimately, mechanical failure of skeletal
elements. These processes are implicated in a wide range of
conditions, including overuse injuries, tissue fragility in aging,
tendon and ligament failures and degenerative joint disease.
A major function of Haversian (osteonal) remodeling is to
remove and replace regions of compact bone that accumulate
microdamage due to fatigue. However, little is known about the
damage or remodeling responses that occur at the levels of fatigue
expected to result from normal wear and tear. In particular, how
bone-remodeling units "target" microscopically damaged areas of bone
is unknown. Our recent studies of remodeling-repair of microdamage
find that intracortical resorption effectively removes both
linear-type microcracks and diffuse matrix damage. Alterations of
osteocyte and canalicular integrity are observed in microdamaged
areas. Resorption spaces were also seen within areas of cortex in
which no bone matrix damage occurred, but alterations of osteocyte
and canalicular integrity were evident. Recent studies indicate that
these alterations of osteocyte integrity correspond to osteocyte
apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Thus, osteocyte death or damage
may provide a key stimulus for this signaling or targeting the
remodeling process in bone.

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF MITCH SCHAFFLER: Major research efforts in bone
biomechanics and tissue physiology, with emphasis on understanding
mechanical wear and tear (fatigue) processes in skeletal tissues, and
the cellular/molecular mechanisms used in the detection and repair of
connective tissue matrix injury. Related areas of interest extend to
aging and skeletal fragility, including osteoporosis, and the healing
and regeneration of bone.

NOTE: BEFORE MITCH SCHAFFLER SPEAKS, TIM BROMAGE (ANTHROPOLOGY,
HUNTER COLLEGE) WILL TAKE ABOUT 2 OR 3 MINUTES TO PRESENT EXCERPTS
FROM AN EXHIBIT OF DIGITAL PHOTOMICROGRAPHY OF HARD TISSUES THAT HE
CURATED. THE EXHIBIT IS ENTITLED "THE MICROSCOPE AND THE SKELETON"
AND IT WILL OPEN AT HUNTER COLLAGE TWO DAYS BEFORE THE NEXT SEMINAR,
ON TUESDAY FEBRUARY 19TH. SEE BONENET.NET FOR MORE DETAILS; CLICK ON
THE PICTURE ON THE FIRST PAGE. THERE IS ONE WORD THAT IS INCORRECT ON
THE WEBSITE POSTING, OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19,
5:30-7:30 P.M. SHOULD BE OPENING RECEPTION: TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19,
5:30-7:30 P.M.

WHERE AND WHEN: The seminar series is to be held this Spring in room
9207 at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center (GC)
on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 PM. There will be some socializing before
the seminar in the GC snack bar on the first floor, the 365 Express.

TRAVEL TO THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK (CUNY) GRADUATE CENTER (GC)

The Graduate Center (GC) of the City University of New York
(CUNY) is located in the newly renovated Altman Building at 365 5th
Avenue. The Altman Building occupies a city block bounded by 35th and
34th street on the north and south, respectively, and by Madison
Avenue and 5th Avenue and on the east and west, respectively. The
Altman Building is catty-corner from the Empire State Building. The
GC shares this building with the Science Division of the New York
Public Library and Oxford University Press. The entrance to the GC is
on 5th Avenue between, and almost equidistant from, East 34th Street
and East 35th Street.

The Pennsylvania Station (Amtrak, LLRR and New Jersey
Transit) is between 31st street and 33rd street on 7th Avenue. Grand
Central Station (Metro North) is on 42nd Street at Park Avenue. Park
Avenue is two blocks east of 5th Avenue (Madison is in between). Both
of these main line stations are short walks from the GC. The PATH
trains to New Jersey have a station at 34th Street and 6th Avenue.
There is also a heliport at 34th Street and East river, 6 avenue
blocks to the east.

Almost all the Manhattan subway lines have a station on 34th
Street and within several avenue blocks of the GC. There are a number
of bus lines that run on 34th street and on 5th Avenue. There are a
number of parking garages around the GC. There is money to support
parking for interested students, apply to Steve Cowin
(scccc@cunyvm.cuny,edu).

THE LOCATION OF THE BONE SEMINAR ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE GRADUATE CENTER (GC)

When you enter the GC from 5th Avenue there is a reception
counter in the center of a reception room and the elevators are
straight ahead. If you arrive at the GC with a few minutes to spare
before 7 PM you should consider stopping at the 365 Express on the
1st floor for sandwiches, snacks and drinks and to socialize with the
other seminar attendees and the evening's speaker. The 365 Express is
directly off the GC reception room on the 1st floor (the room you
entered from the street), off the southeast corner of the room. Room
9207 is on the 9th floor.

CLOSING NOTES

Future seminars are posted on www.bonenet.net, a website dedicated to
research on the mechanosensory system in bone. (This website is
operational, but not fully developed and suggestions for further
development of the site would be appreciated.) You may request a
reminder for each seminar by sending an email to Steve Cowin
(scccc@cunyvm.cuny.edu).

We will welcome your attendance and hope that you will pass along
this information to interested colleagues. Please direct your
questions, requests for more information and feedback to me.

Kind regards, Steve Cowin

--

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The City College
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