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View Full Version : NYC bone seminar on Thursday night,April 18th by Susannah P. Fritton on DELINEATING THE PATHWAY OFINTERSTITIAL FLUID FLOW IN BONE



Steve Cowin
04-08-2002, 11:32 PM
To Bone Researchers in the NYC area:
The last NYC mineralized tissue seminar of the Spring 2002
series will be on Thursday night, April18th. The speaker is Professor
Susannah P. Fritton, PhD, Associate Professor of Mechanical
Engineering, The City College. She will speak on DELINEATING THE
PATHWAY OF INTERSTITIAL FLUID FLOW IN BONE An abstract of this talk
and a description of Professor Fritton's research interests are given
below. The information on the fall 2002 seminar speakers will soon be
posted on www.bonenet.net in the late summer. Amongst the spears in
the fall will be Adele Boskey and Aaron Posner.

April 18th, 2002 in room C197 at the CUNY Graduate Center at 7 PM.

Speaker: Professor Susannah P. Fritton, PhD, Associate Professor of
Mechanical Engineering, The City College

Title: DELINEATING THE PATHWAY OF INTERSTITIAL FLUID FLOW IN BONE

Abstract: Although it is well accepted that mechanical signals are
critical to maintain an adequate skeleton, the mechanism by which
bone cells sense their mechanical environment and initiate the
resorption and/or deposition of bone tissue is not known.
Load-induced interstitial fluid flow is believed to play a role in
bone's mechanosensory system via the shear stresses that it produces
on bone cells, stresses that have been shown to produce biochemical
responses in bone cells in vitro. Load-induced bone fluid flow has
also been proposed to enhance mass transport in bone to ensure the
metabolic function of bone cells that is crucial for bone growth,
maintenance, and adaptation.
Diffusion of molecules through the porous bone matrix has been
studied in animal models using injected tracers, and recently tracer
methods have been used to experimentally confirm the existence of
load-induced transport within bone tissue. However, because bone
tissue has three distinct porosities (vascular, lacunar-canalicular,
and collagen-hydroxyapatite), understanding bone fluid flow remains a
challenge. A fundamental question remains unanswered: What is the
size of the smallest bone pore that is available for interstitial
fluid flow? Conflicting reports exist in the literature as to whether
bone fluid can flow through the smallest pores in the mineralized
matrix (the collagen-hydroxyapatite microporosity) in addition to
flowing through the lacunar-canalicular porosity. In this seminar,
our recent work documenting where injected tracers of different sizes
travel in the bone microporosity will be presented and compared to
findings from the literature. Delineating the pathway of bone
interstitial fluid flow will help to further delineate bone's
microstructure and should contribute to the understanding of bone's
mechanosensory system.

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF SUSANNAH FRITTON: Understanding the adaptive
response of bone to mechanical forces; bone's mechanosensory system.

POSTERS PRESENTATIONS AT THE SEMINAR: In addition to the podium
speaker, there is the possibility of two poster presentations at each
seminar. The poster boards will be in the room of the podium talk.
The podium talk will begin at 7 PM and the poster presenters are
asked to have their posters up by 6:30 PM and to be available between
6:30 and 7 PM and between 8 and 8:30 PM to discuss their poster with
the attendees. In order to make a poster presentation send Steve
Cowin (scccc@cunyvm.cuny.edu) the following three items for the
announcement of the seminar and posters: (1) poster presenter name
and affiliation, (2) title and abstract and (3) research interests of
the poster presenter. Please transmit this information about a week
before the seminar. If there are more than two submissions,
Preference will be given to posters related to the topic talk.
Students would be encouraged to submit posters.
The poster boards supplied by the CUNY graduate school have a
"pin-able" area that is 45 inches wide and about 65 inches tall.
However the bottom of the board is so very low it is only good for
creatures whose eyes are about 20 inches about the ground, thus there
is a usable area about 45 inches square.

WHERE AND WHEN: The seminar series is to be held this Spring in room
C197 at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center (GC)
on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 PM. The room C197 is in the concourse in
the cellar. There will be some socializing before the seminar in the
GC snack bar on the first floor, the 365 Express.

TRAVEL TO THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK (CUNY) GRADUATE CENTER (GC)

The Graduate Center (GC) of the City University of New York
(CUNY) is located in the newly renovated Altman Building at 365 5th
Avenue. The Altman Building occupies a city block bounded by 35th and
34th street on the north and south, respectively, and by Madison
Avenue and 5th Avenue and on the east and west, respectively. The
Altman Building is catty-corner from the Empire State Building. The
GC shares this building with the Science Division of the New York
Public Library and Oxford University Press. The entrance to the GC is
on 5th Avenue between, and almost equidistant from, East 34th Street
and East 35th Street.

The Pennsylvania Station (Amtrak, LLRR and New Jersey
Transit) is between 31st street and 33rd street on 7th Avenue. Grand
Central Station (Metro North) is on 42nd Street at Park Avenue. Park
Avenue is two blocks east of 5th Avenue (Madison is in between). Both
of these main line stations are short walks from the GC. The PATH
trains to New Jersey have a station at 34th Street and 6th Avenue.
There is also a heliport at 34th Street and East river, 6 avenue
blocks to the east.

Almost all the Manhattan subway lines have a station on 34th
Street and within several avenue blocks of the GC. There are a number
of bus lines that run on 34th street and on 5th Avenue. There are a
number of parking garages around the GC. There is money to support
parking for interested students, apply to Steve Cowin
(scccc@cunyvm.cuny.edu).

THE LOCATION OF THE BONE SEMINAR ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE GRADUATE CENTER (GC)

When you enter the GC from 5th Avenue there is a reception
counter in the center of a reception room and the elevators are
straight ahead. If you arrive at the GC with a few minutes to spare
before 7 PM you should consider stopping at the 365 Express on the
1st floor for sandwiches, snacks and drinks and to socialize with the
other seminar attendees and the evening's speaker. The 365 Express is
directly off the GC reception room on the 1st floor (the room you
entered from the street), off the southeast corner of the room. Room
C197 is in the cellar concourse.

CLOSING NOTES

Future seminars are posted on www.bonenet.net, a website dedicated to
research on the mechanosensory system in bone. (This website is
operational, but not fully developed and suggestions for further
development of the site would be appreciated.) You may request a
reminder for each seminar by sending an email to Steve Cowin
(scccc@cunyvm.cuny.edu).

We will welcome your attendance and hope that you will pass along
this information to interested colleagues. Please direct your
questions, requests for more information and feedback to me.

Kind regards, Steve Cowin

--

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Stephen C. Cowin
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Stephen C. Cowin
Director, New York Center for Biomedical Engineering
School of Engineering
The City College
138th Street and Convent Avenue
New York, NY 10031-9198, U. S. A.
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