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View Full Version : THE NYC BONME SEMINAR (12/19/02) WILL BE CANCELLED IF THERE IS ANYC TRANSIT STRIKE: Title of Seminar: MECHANISMS OF ACTION OFMATRIX PHOSPHOPROTEINS IN THE REGULATION OF BIOMINERALIZATION,SPEAKER: ADELE BOSKEY



Steve Cowin
12-15-2002, 12:02 AM
To Bone Researchers in the NYC area:
The NYC mineralized tissue seminar will have its next seminar
in the Fall 2002 series on Thursday night, December 19th. Please note
that this seminar will be cancelled if there is a NYC trransit
strike. The speaker is Adele Boskey, Starr Chair in Mineralized
Tissue Research and Director of the Mineralized Tissue Laboratory,
Hospital for Special Surgery. She will speak on MECHANISMS OF ACTION
OF MATRIX PHOSPHOPROTEINS IN THE REGULATION OF BIOMINERALIZATION.
There will be food (fruit, vegetables, cookies) and drink (coffee,
soft drinks) available in the seminar room from 5:45 PM to the start
of the seminar. Please come early, chat, and snack. Please note that
the seminar is in Room 9207 rather than the room of the last three
seminars, 9205 (the two rooms are adjacent).
An abstract of this talk and a description of Adele's
research interests are given below. The same information on the other
spring seminar speakers is posted on www.bonenet.net and will be
circulated as the date of each seminar approaches.

Speaker: ADELE L BOSKEY, PhD. Starr Chair in Mineralized Tissue
Research and Director of the Mineralized Tissue Laboratory, Hospital
for Special Surgery; Professor of Biochemistry, Weill Medical College
of Cornell University; Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering,
City College of NY

Title: MECHANISMS OF ACTION OF MATRIX PHOSPHOPROTEINS IN THE
REGULATION OF BIOMINERALIZATION

Abstract: The matrices of many species that deposit intracellular or
extracellular minerals are rich in anionic proteins. These proteins
are thought to regulate mineral deposition acting as ion reservoirs,
nucleators, and regulators of growth. In bone, calcified cartilage,
and dentin there are several proteins that are differentially
phosphorylated by the action of kinases and phosphatases. The extent
of phosphorylation varies with tissue site. It is hypothesized that
the extent of phosphorylation determines the ways in which each of
these proteins regulates the mineralization process. To validate
this hypothesis for each protein, four pieces of evidence are
required. First the protein must be changed (in content or
phosphorylation state) at the site of mineralization. Second
solution-based studies should demonstrate distinct effects of the
phosphorylated/-dephosphorylated proteins on apatite (bone-like
mineral) formation and/or crystal growth. Third, the phosphorylated
and dephosphorylated proteins should have distinct effects on cell
mediated in vitro mineralization. Finally, animal models or examples
of human diseases, in which the protein is ablated or over-expressed,
should show alterations in mineral and hence mechanical properties.
Verification of this hypothesis based on osteopontin and dentin
matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) will be discussed.

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF ADELE BOSKEY: Dr Boskey is a physical chemist
with a long-standing interest in the factors regulating mineral
deposition, mineral growth, and remodeling in bones and teeth. These
questions have a bearing on treatment of diseases in which
mineralization is altered (osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta,
osteomalacia, osteopetrosis, etc.), in the prevention of dystrophic
calcification in arteries, prosthetic valves, and other soft tissues,
and in engineering bone replacement.

ORGANIZATION OF THE SEMINAR SERIES
The Interinstitutional Steering Committee (ISC) will make decisions
concerning the seminar series, including the selection of speakers.
Interesting, high quality seminar speakers are sought. Seminar
attendees are asked to help in the identification of investigators
with new results relative to the bone research, questions of current
interest and distinguished bone researchers visiting New York City
who might be persuaded to present a seminar. Presentations by
advanced graduate students and post-docs are encouraged.
The members of the Interinstitutional Steering Committee (ISC) are
Adele Boskey (Head of the Mineralized Tissue Section at the Hospital
for Special Surgery and Professor of Biochemistry at the Weill
Medical College of Cornell University), Timothy Bromage (Director of
the Hard Tissue Research Unit and Professor of Anthropology at Hunter
College of CUNY), Stephen C. Cowin (Director of the New York Center
for Biomedical Engineering (NYCBE) and Professor of Biomedical and
Mechanical Engineering at the City College of the City University of
New York (CUNY)), Susannah P. Fritton (Director of the Tissue
Mechanics Laboratory, New York Center for Biomedical Engineering and
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the City College of
CUNY), X. Edward Guo (Director of the Bone Bioengineering Laboratory
and Assistant Professor of Bioengineering at Columbia University),
Clinton T. Rubin (Professor and Chair of the Department of Biomedical
Engineering, and Director of the Center for Advanced Technology in
Medical Biotechnology at SUNY Stony Brook) and Mitchell B. Schaffler
(Director of Orthopaedic Research and Professor of Orthopedics, Cell
Biology and Anatomy at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine). Each of
these people represents a community consisting of senior bone
research people, graduate students and, in most cases, undergraduate
students.

PLEASE DIRECT YOUR QUESTIONS AND FEEDBACK TO

Stephen C. Cowin
Director, New York Center for Biomedical Engineering
School of Engineering
The City College
138th Street and Convent Avenue
New York, NY 10031-9198, U. S. A.

Phone (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
Fax (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
Phone (212) 650-5208 (Work)
Email

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