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David P. Dillard
11-26-2003, 02:55 AM
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2003 10:55:35 -0500 (EST)
From: David P. Dillard
Reply-To: NetGold@yahoogroups.com
To: NetGold
Subject: [NetGold] PERIODICALS: ELECTRONIC: ONLINE: ISSUES: Self-Archiving
FAQ for the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI)

PERIODICALS: ELECTRONIC: ONLINE: ISSUES: Self-Archiving FAQ for the
Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI)

Self-Archiving FAQ


Contents of the FAQ and Excerpts Designed to Provide Overview of and
Reasons for Engaging in This Project.

The Research Impact Cycle : Maximizing Research Access In Order to
Maximize and Accelerate Research Impact.
Model institutional self-archiving policy
Berlin Declaration

What-is/why/how FAQs:

What is self-archiving?
What is the Open Archives Initiative (OAI)?
What is OAI-compliance?
What is an Eprint Archive?
How can I or my institution create an Eprint Archive?
How can an institution facilitate the filling of its Eprint Archives?
What is the purpose of self-archiving?
What is the difference between distributed and central self-archiving?
What is the difference between institutional and central Eprint Archives?
Who should self-archive?
What is an Eprint?
Why should one self-archive?
What should be self-archived?
Is self-archiving publication?
What about copyright?
What if my copyright transfer agreement explicitly forbids self-archiving?
Peer-review reform: Why bother with peer review?
Is self-archiving legal?
What if the publisher forbids preprint self-archiving?

What-to-do FAQs:

What can researcher/authors do to facilitate self-archiving?
What can researchers' institutions do to facilitate self-archiving?
What can libraries do to facilitate self-archiving?
What can research funders do to facilitate self-archiving?
What can publishers do to facilitate self-archiving?

"I-worry-about..." FAQs (grouped thematically):

I. 10. Copyright
II. 7. Peer review
5. Certification
6. Evaluation
22. Tenure/Promotion
13. Censorship
III. 29. Sitting Pretty
4. Navigation (info-glut)
IV. 1. Preservation
2. Authentication
3. Corruption
23. Version control
25. Mark-up
26. Classification
16. Graphics
15. Readability
21. Serendipity
18. Libraries'/Librarians' future
V. 19. Learned Societies' future
VI. 17. Publishers' future
9. Downsizing
8. Paying the piper
14. Capitalism
24. Napster
31. Waiting for Gold
VII. 20. University conspiracy
30. Rechanneling toll-savings
28. Affordability
VIII. 12. Priority
27. Secrecy
IX. 11. Plagiarism

"What is self-archiving?

To self-archive is to deposit a digital document in a publicly accessible
website, preferably an OAI-compliant Eprint Archive. Depositing involves a
simple web interface where the depositer copy/pastes in the "metadata"
(date, author-name, title, journal-name, etc.) and then attaches the
full-text document. Software is also being developed to allow documents to
be self-archived in bulk, rather than just one by one.


What is the Open Archives Initiative (OAI)?

The Open Archives Initiative (OAI) has designed a shared code for metadata
tags (e.g., "date," "author," "title," "journal" etc.). See the OAI FAQ.
The full-text documents may be in different formats and locations, but if
they use the same metadata tags they become "interoperable." Their
metadata can be "harvested " and all the documents can then be jointly
searched and retrieved as if they were all in one global collection,
accessible to everyone.

What is OAI-compliance?

OAI-compliance means using the OAI metadata tags. A document can be
OAI-compliant and an Eprint archive can be OAI-compliant. All
OAI-compliant documents in OAI-compliant archives are interoperable. This
means distributed documents can be treated as if they were all in one
place and one format.

What is an Eprint Archive?

An Eprint Archive is a collection of digital documents. OAI-compliant
Eprint Archives share the same metadata, making their contents
interoperable with one another. Their metadata can then be harvested into
global "virtual" archives that are seamlessly navigable by any user (just
as a commercial index or abstract database is navigable, but with
full-text access)."

===========================================

Much can be learned about the Open Archives movement and E-Print archives
from the archives of the LIBLICENSE-L discussion group.

Liblicense-L List Archives
http://www.library.yale.edu/~llicense/ListArchives/

LIBLICENSE Discussion List Home Page: Ann Okerson Moderator


Search results for '(open or opened or opening or openings or openness or
opener or opens or openest or openly or openers) and (access or accessed
or accessing or accesses)'

Documents 1 - 10 of 786 matches

A short URL that leads directly to these search results:



Search results for 'eprint'

Documents 1 - 10 of 51 matches.

A short URL that leads directly to these search results:



====================================

The bottom line for the student, learner, researcher or person who reads
heavily is that many research articles from a very wide range of fields
will be openly available at no cost to the reader as a result of eprints
archived as part of the open access movement.


Sincerely,
David Dillard
Temple University
(215) 204 - 4584
jwne@astro.temple.edu




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