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View Full Version : NY Bone Seminar, Tuesday February 3rd at 7 PM, JACK RICCI,on TISSUE RESPONSE TO SCAFFOLD ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES ACROSSLENGTH SCALES.



Steve Cowin
01-27-2004, 11:42 PM
To Bone Researchers in the NYC area:

The NYC Mineralized Tissue Seminar will
have its first spring seminar on Tuesday night
February 3rd in room 9204 at the CUNY Graduate
Center at 7 PM. The speaker is JACK RICCI,
Associate Professor, Department of Biomaterials
and Biomimetics, New York University College of
Dentistry. He will speak on TISSUE RESPONSE TO
SCAFFOLD ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES ACROSS LENGTH
SCALES.

The seminar program and workshop
information is regularly posted on
www.bonenet.net, a website dedicated to research
on the mechanosensory system in bone. This
website has been totally renovated in January
2004, please check it out and let us have your
reaction. The man who accomplished the
renovation, Bill Green, will attend Jack's
seminar and he would appreciate feedback on the
website.

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THE SPRING 2004 BONE SEMINAR PROGRAM

The seminar series will be held at the CUNY
Graduate Center on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 PM.
All of the seminars will be held in Room 9204 on
the ninth floor. The CUNY Graduate Center is in
the Altman Building at the corner of 34th Street
and 5th Avenue, catty-corner from the Empire
State Building. There will be some socializing
before the seminar in the seminar room from 5:45
PM. Also, from 5:45 PM until 7 PM there will be
food (fruit plate, vegetable plate, cookies) and
drink (coffee and soft drinks) available in the
seminar room. There is also a Graduate Center
snack bar on the first floor; besides the usual
snacks and drinks the 365 Express also carries
beer and wine.
There are several subway lines nearby and it is
less than a ten-minute walk to either Grand
Central Station or Penn Station. There is money
to support parking for graduate students, apply
to Steve Cowin (contact information at the
bottom).

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FEBRUARY 3rd, 2004 in room 9204 at the CUNY Graduate Center at 7 PM.

Speaker: JOHN L. RICCI, PhD, Associate Professor,
Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New
York University College of Dentistry.

Title: TISSUE RESPONSE TO SCAFFOLD ARCHITECTURAL
FEATURES ACROSS LENGTH SCALES

Abstract: Cell and tissue response to any type of
implantable scaffold or biomaterial can be
controlled by a complex combination of the
chemical composition, surface microstructure,
macrostructure, engineering design, and control
of the functional environment of the implant. If
engineered properly, the biomaterial scaffold and
biological tissue can become a fully integrated
composite. In order to optimize the integration
of implant and tissue we must understand biologic
response across length scales from nanostructural
range to millimeter range, and utilize material
fabrication techniques that allow us to control
the structure of the biomaterial surface in these
same ranges. We divide these scales into four
functional ranges. The nanostructural range
(submicron range) represents surface chemistry,
the size scale in which the biomaterial or
scaffold surface interacts on the molecular level
with adsorbed biomolecules such as proteins and
extracellular matrix components. The
microstructural range (from ~1-20Ám) represents
the range in which the surface interacts with the
cell surface and directs cell attachment, cell
shape, migration, and spreading. The
mesostructural range (from ~20-1000Ám) represents
the range in which the scaffold structure
interacts with the tissue as a combination of
cells, extracellular matrix, and vessels.
Scaffold design versus nutrient diffusion now
becomes a consideration, as does pore and strut
dimension versus the sizes of ingrowing
structures such as blood vessels and bone
trabeculae. The fourth and largest range, the
macrostructural range (from 1-102mm) represents
the range in which the implant/scaffold interacts
with anatomic structures such as layers of skin
and subcutaneous tissue, or muscles, bone,
tendon, or organs.
Our recent research has utilized advances in
materials fabrication and surface modification
technologies to superimposed combinations of
defined meso- and microgeometries onto materials
with proven surface chemistry (nanostructure) to
create permanent and resorbable bone implants and
scaffolds. Over the last few years we have
developed dental implants with laser-machined,
controlled surface microgeometries that are now
in clinical use and are exhibiting excellent
clinical results. We are also investigating 3-D
printed ceramic and polymeric bone replacement
structures that utilize controlled mesostructure
and microstructure to enhance bone ingrowth and
integration. These are intended for use as bone
graft replacement materials. The current status
of these projects will be discussed along with
future implications.

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PLEASE DIRECT YOUR QUESTIONS AND FEEDBACK TO

Stephen C. Cowin
New York Center for Biomedical Engineering
Departments of Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering
School of Engineering
The City College
138th Street and Convent Avenue
New York, NY 10031-9198, U. S. A.

Phone (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
Fax (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
Phone (212) 650-5208 (Work)
Email



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