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rday50
02-23-2004, 04:45 PM
We had a similar need to be able to mount a Kistler plate in several configurations in the floor of our biomechanics lab.

We built our own index plate (ie a steel plate with many holes in it, floated on concrete and levelled) and a bronze air bearing between the load plate and index plate. When the air was turned on, cylinders pulled the dowel pins up. Pressure was then fed to the bearing labyrinth to float the plate. After pushing the plate in to position (one hand was often all that was needed), turning the air off dropped the dowel pins in to the index plate.

The bearing was then turned off and the space around the plate filled with spacing stools to suit. We made a range of these to accommodate several positions, and I think that this problem of filling the rest of the big hole in the floor may be the biggest hurdle you face in having a freely positionable plate.

You will note that in this system the load plate is not bolted down. We found that the combination of well fitting dowel pins and a massive bronze bearing block (probably about 50 kg of bronze, at a guess) still gave us good dynamic response for our gait studies.

Rob.
--
Robert Day ph +61 8 9224 3227
Project Bioengineer fax +61 8 9224 1138
Royal Perth Hospital robert.day@health.wa.gov.au

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Glazier, Paul [mailto:PGlazier@UWIC.AC.UK]
> Sent: Monday, 23 February 2004 4:36 AM
> To: BIOMCH-L@NIC.SURFNET.NL
> Subject: [BIOMCH-L] Adjustable Force Plate Mountings
>
>
> Dear Subscribers,
>
> We are currently renovating our motion analysis workshop and
> we are looking
> to include position-adjustable mountings for our two Kistler
> (9287BA and
> 9281CA) force plates. Currently, the only option available to
> us appears to
> be a steel plate supplied by Kistler with many holes drilled
> into it, thus
> enabling multiple longitudinal and transverse force plate
> positioning. Do
> any subscribers know of any other ways of making the force plate
> freely-positionable? I am thinking along the lines of a sliding rail,
> similar to those used in industrial workshops to stabilise
> machinery (e.g.,
> lathes, milling machines, etc.).
>
> I would appreciate any assistance you could provide.
>
> Kind Regards,
>
> Paul Glazier
>
> Senior Sports Science Technician (Biomechanics)
> Biomechanics Laboratory
> National Indoor Athletics Centre
> Cyncoed Campus
> Cyncoed Road
> Cardiff
> CF23 6XD
> Wales, UK
>
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