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Steve Cowin
09-03-2006, 03:37 AM
Hi Folks:

The Fall 2006 Bone Seminar Series begins on Tuesday, September 12th
with a presentation by Philipp Mayer-Kuckuk, Ph.D., Memorial
Sloan-Kettering, UMDNJ and Hospital for Special Surgery. He will
speak on " Strategies for imaging bone cell biology in mice and man"

Please respond to the request for feedback on the continuation of
seminar refreshments below.

Details about all seminars appear below as well as on our website:
http://bonenet.net

The contents of the rest of this email are as follows:
[1] Bone Seminar Series: General Information
[2] September 12th, 2006 Phillipp Mayer-Kuckuk PhD Host: Chris Fritton
[3] October 17th, 2006 Shelly Buffenstein PhD Host: Bob Majeska
[4] November 14th, 2006 Elizabeth Shane MD Host: Ed Guo
[5] December 5th, 2006 Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic Host: Ed Guo


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THE BONE SEMINAR SERIES

The Bone Seminar Series has as its focus the mechanosensory system in
bone. Seminar program and workshop information are regularly posted
on www.bonenet.net, a website dedicated to research on the
mechanosensory system in bone. Please send comments on the website to
the webmaster, Bill Green or to me
. Please let us have your comments.

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THE FALL 2006 BONE SEMINAR PROGRAM

Seminars will be held on Tuesdays from 7:00 to about 8:30 PM in the
rooms indicated in the CUNY Graduate Center at the corner of 34th
Street and 5th Avenue, catty-corner from the Empire State Building.
There will be some socializing before the seminar in the seminar room
from 5:45 PM.
There are several subway lines nearby, and it is less than a
ten-minute walk to either Grand Central Station or Penn Station.
There is money to support parking for graduate students; apply to
Steve Cowin (contact information at the bottom).

A REQUEST FOR FEEDBACK ON THE CONTINUATION OF SEMINAR REFRESHMENTS

The refreshments that were available before the seminars in previous
years will not be available to the first seminar of the fall 2006
series and, possibly, in subsequent seminars. I would appreciate your
opinion and/or suggestions on the possible reinstitution of seminar
refreshments, given the cost. Any refreshments at the Graduate center
must be purchased from an in-house organization (Restaurant
Associates at The Graduate Center -CUNY, Catering Department). Until
February of 2006 the cost of each seminar's refreshments was $215. In
March of 2006 the cost of the same refreshments jumped to $375 due to
a surcharge of $160 that was added for "late night service." Given
that we have an average attendance of about 25, these refreshments
cost about $15 per person. If a significant number of our attendees
think that this is an important feature of the seminar (given this
cost), I will find the money to do it. I would like to hear from
attendees (pro and con) on this issue and learn of any alternative
suggestions, .

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SEPTEMBER 12th , 2006 in room C205 at the CUNY
Graduate Center at 7:00 PM

Speaker: PHILIPP MAYER-KUCKUK, Ph.D., In Vivo Cellular Molecular
Imaging Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Department
of Pharmacology, UMDNJ Musculoskeletal Integrity Program, Hospital
for Special Surgery

Title: STRATEGIES FOR IMAGING BONE CELL BIOLOGY
IN MICE AND MAN

Host: Chris Fritton

ABSTRACT: Bone is a highly complex tissue. It is composed of cells
such as the complementing osteoblasts and osteoclasts as well as
organic macromolecules and mineral. Physiologically relevant studies
of cell-cell and cell-structure interactions within this composite
tissue often demand in vivo observations. To this end we have
proposed the application of a novel investigation strategy called
Molecular Imaging. We suggest that this method may allow for the
non-invasive detection and measurement of biological pathways in a
living subject and we are among the institutions pioneering this
approach for orthopedic research. This presentation will provide an
overview of several of our upcoming studies that will utilize
advanced molecular imaging for the study of bone cell biology. Over
the course of the talk, I will introduce molecular imaging, discuss
the reporter gene imaging concept, outline GAIM: Genetically Altered
and Imaging Competent Mice, and describe SIM: Small Imaging Molecules
which may allow future clinical application of orthopedic molecular
imaging

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF PHILIPP MAYER-KUCKUK: Osteoblast and osteoclast
biology, including precursor cells and mechanotransduction;
pre-clinical and clinical molecular imaging; osteogenesis imperfecta

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OCTOBER 17th, 2006 in room C205 at the CUNY Graduate Center at 7:00 PM

Speaker: ROCHELLE BUFFENSTEIN, Ph.D. and YAEL GRUN-KRAMER, Department
of Biology, City College of New York

Host: Bob Majeska

Title: AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN BONE METABOLISM IN THE
LONGEST-LIVING RODENT, THE NAKED MOLE-RAT

ABSTRACT: Naked mole-rats are the longest-living rodent known, living
eight times longer than similar-sized mice and exhibiting a similar
longevity quotient (the ratio of actual lifespan to that predicted by
body mass) to humans. These highly social rodents, unlike most
mammals appear to retain the ability to reproduce throughout their
long lives. Age-related changes in body composition, metabolism and
physiological function are markedly attenuated suggesting that rates
of aging are retarded; however the mechanisms protecting naked
mole-rats from the ubiquitous aging process and concomitant
age-related diseases are unknown. As aging occurs, the efficiency of
bones to respond to endogenous and environmental stresses declines
such that bone remodeling is attenuated. This may result in a net
loss of bone mineral content and increased risk of fracture that
contributes to the increase in frailty as all mammals age and
ultimately leads to their demise. Mechanisms employed in bone aging
are not well understood and there is a constant search for a more
appropriate mammalian laboratory model for assessing bone aging.
Given their long lifespan, we would expect that these rodents, unlike
mice, would require protection of bone integrity and would employ
highly efficient bone remodeling processes. Specifically, we
hypothesize that as aging occurs bone quality and structure in the
naked mole-rat will be retained, and that bone remodeling efficacy
would be superior to that of mice. Cross sectional femur geometry
data reveal that NMRs maintain thicker cortical bone than do mice and
that age-related declines in cortical bone was very small. This
appears to be most pronounced in breeding females. Furthermore,
considerable evidence reveals that these rodents continuously remodel
their trabecular bone and maintain structural integrity throughout
their long lives. Clearly, given these features, NMRs may prove to be
a useful model with which to study changes in bone with aging as well
as the mechanisms that facilitate bone protection in long-lived
mammals.

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF SHELLEY BUFFENSTEIN: I am a comparative
physiologist primarily interested in understanding the tremendous
variability in maximum lifespan among species and the proximate
mechanisms employed in aging. I currently am studying both
age-related changes in physiological function in the longest-living
rodent, the naked mole-rat as well as oxidative stress and other
mechanisms of aging in rodents that show disparate longevity.

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NOVEMBER 14th, 2006 in room C205 at the CUNY Graduate Center at 7:00 PM

Speaker: ELIZABETH SHANE MD, Professor of Clinical Medicine,
Columbia University

Title: BONE QUALITY IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN WITH
UNEXPLAINED FRAGILITY FRACTURES

Host: Ed Guo

ABSTRACT: In this presentation, I will consider the causes of
osteoporosis in premenopausal women and will review the results of
recently published and ongoing studies focused on the pathogenesis of
bone fragility in young, otherwise healthy women with unexplained
fragility fractures, including static and dynamic quantitative
histomorphometry, micro-CT, and mineralization density.

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF ELIZABETH SHANE: Osteoporosis, Secondary
Osteoporosis (Organ Transplantation, GI Tract Disease, Medications),
Renal Bone Disease, Hyperparathyroidism

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December 5th, 2006 in room 9204 at the CUNY Graduate Center at 7:00 PM

Speaker: GORDANA VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC PhD, Department of Biomedical
Engineering, Columbia University

Host: Ed Guo

ABSTRACT: Human bone marrow contains a population of mesenchymal stem
cells (hMSC) capable of forming several types of mesenchymal tissues,
including bone and cartilage. In vitro expansion and cultivation of
hMSC on biomaterial scaffolds could facilitate osteochondral repair,
where functional autologous cartilage/bone constructs would be grown
and subsequently implanted into the defect site to promote healing.
In this talk, I'll discuss tissue engineering and animal studies of
large, mineralized bone constructs and osteochondral grafts by
bioreactor cultivation of hMSC on three-dimensional scaffolds. Under
best culture conditions, the volume fractions of mineralized tissue
came into the range of values measured for human lumbar verterbral
bone.

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF GORDANA VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC: Tissue engineering of
functional human grafts for clinical application and controlled
studies of normal and pathological cell and tissue function. Our
general approach is to use human stem cells (adult or embryonic) and
culture them on three-dimensional scaffolds (designed to mimic the
native tissue matrix) in bioreactors (designed to provide
developmentally relevant molecular and physical regulatory factors).
Two groups of tissues are of great interest to our lab: osteochondral
(cartilage, bone, anatomically shaped stratified grafts) and cardiac
(synchronously contractile cardiac muscle).

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ORGANIZATION OF THE SEMINAR SERIES

The Interinstitutional Steering Committee (ISC) will make
decisions concerning the seminar series, including the selection of
speakers. Interesting, high quality seminar speakers are sought.
Seminar attendees are asked to help in the identification of
investigators with new results relative to bone research, questions
of current interest and distinguished bone researchers visiting New
York City who might be persuaded to present a seminar. Presentations
by advanced graduate students and post-docs are encouraged.
The members of the Interinstitutional Steering Committee
(ISC) are Adele Boskey (Head of the Mineralized Tissue Section at the
Hospital for Special Surgery and Professor of Biochemistry at the
Weill Medical College of Cornell University), Timothy Bromage
(Director, Hard Tissue Research Unit, New York University College of
Dentistry), Stephen C. Cowin (Professor of Biomedical and Mechanical
Engineering at the City College of the City University of New York
(CUNY)), Susannah P. Fritton (Director of the Tissue Mechanics
Laboratory, New York Center for Biomedical Engineering and Associate
Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the City College of CUNY), X.
Edward Guo (Director of the Bone Bioengineering Laboratory and
Associate Professor of Bioengineering at Columbia University),
Clinton T. Rubin (Professor and Chair of the Department of Biomedical
Engineering, and Director of the Center for Advanced Technology in
Medical Biotechnology at SUNY Stony Brook) and Mitchell B. Schaffler
(Director of Orthopaedic Research and Professor of Orthopedics, Cell
Biology and Anatomy at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine). Each of
these people represents a community consisting of senior bone
research people, graduate students and, in most cases, undergraduate
students.

PLEASE DIRECT YOUR QUESTIONS AND FEEDBACK TO

Stephen C. Cowin
New York Center for Biomedical Engineering
Departments of Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering
School of Engineering
The City College
138th Street and Convent Avenue
New York, NY 10031-9198, U. S. A.

Phone (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
Fax (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
Phone (212) 650-5208 (Work)
Email