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Steve Cowin
01-26-2007, 02:24 AM
To Bone Researchers in the NYC area:


The Spring 2007 Bone Seminar Series begins on Tuesday, February 6th
with a presentation by Gerard Karsenty, M.D., Ph.D., the Paul A.
Marks Professor and Chairman of the Department of Genetics &
Development, Columbia. He will speak on "Genetic control of bone
mineralization."

Please respond to the request for feedback on the continuation of
seminar refreshments below.

Details about all seminars appear below as well as on our website:
http://bonenet.net

The contents of the rest of this email are as follows:
[1] Bone Seminar Series: General Information
[2] February 6th, 2007 Gerard Karsenty MD, PhD, Host: Ed Guo
[3] March 13th, 2007 Shelly Weinbaum PhD & Clint Rubin PhD; Host: Bob Majeska
[4] April 17th, 2007 Christina Teixeira DMD, MS, PhD, Host: Adele Boskey
[5] May 15th, 2007 Shannon McFarlin PhD, Host: Tim Bromage

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THE BONE SEMINAR SERIES

The Bone Seminar Series has as its focus the mechanosensory system in
bone. Seminar program and workshop information are regularly posted
on www.bonenet.net, a website dedicated to research on the
mechanosensory system in bone. Please send comments on the website to
the webmaster, Bill Green or to me
.

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THE SPRING 2007 BONE SEMINAR PROGRAM

Seminars will be held on Tuesdays from 7:00 to about 8:30 PM in the
rooms indicated in the CUNY Graduate Center at the corner of 34th
Street and 5th Avenue, catty-corner from the Empire State Building.
There are several subway lines nearby, and it is less than a
ten-minute walk to either Grand Central Station or Penn Station.
There is money to support parking for graduate students; apply to
Steve Cowin (contact information at the bottom).

SOCIAL BEFORE EACH SEMINAR

Before each seminar, please join us for an hour or so of socializing
and exchanging ideas beginning at 5:45 PM (to 6:45). All seminar
attendees are invited to gather at the Heartland Brewery (see below)
prior to the presentation. The speakers and others will be downstairs
at the Heartland Brewery starting at 5:45 PM. Appetizers will be
provided as well as non-alcoholic beverages. Supplemental beverages
(i.e, alcoholic) will require out-of-pocket cash. Please note that
there will be no food or beverages provided at the seminar so come
early to the Heartland for both and for good conversations. Ask
downstairs at the Heartland Brewery for the Bone Seminar Group.

Heartland Brewery
350 5th Ave (Corner of 5th and 34th--Empire State Building-
Across 5th from the CUNY Graduate Center)
212 563 3433

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February 6th, 2007 in room 9207 at the CUNY
Graduate Center at 7:00 PM

Speaker: GERARD KARSENTY, M.D., Ph.D., Paul A. Marks Professor and
Chairman of the Department of Genetics & Development, Columbia

Title: GENETIC CONTROL OF BONE MINERALIZATION

Host: Ed Guo

ABSTRACT: We have been studying the genetic control of extracellular
matrix mineralization for the last 12 years. Our main question is why
are the genes involved in the initiation of this process and why is
it restricted to bone? Through the analysis of a mutant mouse strain
we generated in the lab, the mice lacking matrix Gla protein, we came
to realize that bone-like ECM mineralization-can occur in absence of
osteoblasts. This observation challenged the concept that bone
mineralization occurs because of the presence of specific genes in
osteoblasts. This led us to revisit in cell culture and mostly in
vivo the role of the various genes that could be involved in bone
mineralization. We also in the meantime revisited some aspects of
rickets. Our results indicate that to initiate mineralization of the
bone ECM and to restrict it to this ECM, Nature uses a relatively
cheap and trivial trick: it relies on the coexpression in osteoblasts
only of genes that otherwise are more broadly expressed. A more
recent analysis of a mouse model of a human disease brought further
support to this concept.

RESEARCH INTERESTS OF GERARD KARSENTY: Research in my lab focuses on
the genetic control of skeletal development and physiology.

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March 13th, 2007 in room 9207 at the CUNY Graduate Center at 7:00 PM

Speakers: SHELDON WEINBAUM PhD, CUNY Distinguished
Professor of Engineering at the City College of New York
And
CLINTON T. RUBIN, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Chair,
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Director, Center for
Biotechnology, State University of New York at Stony Brook

Title: GOOD, GOOD, GOOD VIBRATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR THE THERAPEUTIC
POTENTIAL OF LOW-MAGNITUDE, HIGH FREQUENCY MECHANICAL SIGNALS

Host: Bob Majeska

ABSTRACT: Exercise is recognized as a critical regulatory signal to
the skeleton, but which specific components are responsible for
influencing bone mass and morphology remains unknown. There is
mounting evidence that extremely low magnitude (