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View Full Version : Summary of responses (re: Present Dummy Neck Work)



Mike Hendley
11-10-1994, 04:40 AM
Dear Netters:

Thank you all very much for taking the time to respond to my query.

As you will notice there seems to be very little information available in
this area at this time. It may be helpful if we can keep each other up to
date as to any new developments.

Mike,

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Date: Wed, 21 Sep 94 17:07:41 EDT
From: bilston@nerve.seas.upenn.edu (Lynne Eckert Bilston)
Posted-Date: Wed, 21 Sep 94 17:07:41 EDT
To: mhendley@fox.nstn.ca
Subject: Re: REQUEST: Crash test dummy - neck info.

I'm in the process of preparing some manuscripts for publication
that use various approaches to investigate the effects on the
cervical spinal cord of the types of flexion and extension motions
seen in frontal and rear car accidents. WE used physical modell
-ing and finite element modeling to look at this. We are mostly
interested in dynamic loading of course, and how that affects the
spinal cord tissue, but we published (in IRCOBI proceedings, 92)
a quasistatic study of how head motion affects the spinal cord
in flexion and extension.

I can't help you with the dummy neck information, although I really
think that the development of a dummy neck that bears some real
resemblance to the human is an important direction for research.

-Lynne Bilston


__________________________________________________ ________________

Lynne E. Bilston
Laboratories for Injury Research and Prevention
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania
220 S. 33rd St, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6392
U.S.A.
__________________________________________________ ________________


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From: Kai Leibrandt
Date: Wed, 21 Sep 1994 21:20:06 -0700
X-Mailer: Z-Mail (3.1.0 22feb94 MediaMail)
To: Mike Hendley
Subject: Re: REQUEST: Crash test dummy - neck info.

Mike,

sounds like your interested in information related to me; I started my PhD in
January, and as part of it I am developing a computer man model which will
hopefully allow for more accurate simulation of various crash situation. For
this I need some real data of course, and much of it has come from TNO in
Holland, who are themselves developing both computer and physical models of the
human body for crash testing purposes. Whereas I am mainly interested in the
lower back and hip region (of which I am currently building a FEA model), there
interest lies pretty much distributed over the body, with extra attention being
paid to the neck region. The guy to contact is Riender Happee. We have had a
bit of an incident here, so I haven't got his address anymore (either email or
surface) at this moment, but I'm working on it. I'll let you know as soon as
poss.

In the mean time, I would be *very* interested in any information you manage to
extract from your initial posting, and would like to hear more about your
project. Let me know if you think I can be of any more help,

Cheerio,


Kai.

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Date: Thu, 22 Sep 94 08:22:54 EDT
From: rshea@rcsuna.gmr.com (Rex Shea)
To: mhendley@FOX.NSTN.CA
Subject: Re: REQUEST: Crash test dummy - neck info.

Mike, you might want to talk to Dr. John Melvin in my department. He used
to do research in that area. His e-mail address is jmelvin@cmsa.gmr.com.

We're now more interested in dummy's performance than its biofidelity, and
have done a lot of work on the dummy behavior under various loadings.

Rex Shea, Ph.D.
Automotive Safety and Health Research (previously Biomedical Science)
GM NAO R&D Center
30500 Mound Road
Warren, MI 48090-9055
(810) 986-1702

rshea@rcsuna.gmr.com

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Date: Thu, 22 Sep 1994 08:23:38 -0400
From: Barry Sidney Myers
To: mhendley@FOX.NSTN.CA
Subject: Re: BIOMCH-L Digest - 20 Sep 1994 to 21 Sep 1994

Several labs and NHTSA are active in that area. James McElhaney,
Roger Nightingale, and I have done a variety of studies on
prototype developement, and cervical impact dynamics.


Barry Myers M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Duke University
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery
Box 90281
Durham NC
27708-0281
(919) 660-5150 (phone)
(919) 660-5362 (fax)

bsm@occiput.lsrc.duke.edu

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Date: Mon, 26 Sep 1994 08:04:03 -0400 (EDT)
From: stuart mcgill
Subject: Re: REQUEST: Crash test dummy - neck info.
To: Mike Hendley

Mike,

I just published a paper with Pat Bishop that reported the bending
stiffness of necks in a sample of young men and women:
McGill, Jones Bennett, Bishop, "Passive stiffness.........), Clinical
Biomechanics, 9:193-198, 1994.
We also repeated the protocol on the hybridIII dummy neck- it is so
much stiffer and more viscoelastic at low loading rates. However, it is
designed for impact and a compliant dummy neck just wouldn't hold up. A
tradeoff I suppose. So I'm not sure how valid it is to test the dummy at
low loading rates but on the other hand we can't test humans at high
loading rates. This is why we didn't include the dummy data in the
paper.
Stu McGill

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Date: Thu, 29 Sep 1994 10:58:36 +1000
Date-warning: Date header was inserted by csdvax.csd.unsw.EDU.AU
From: A.McIntosh@unsw.edu.au (Andrew McIntosh)
Subject: Re: REQUEST: Crash test dummy - neck info.
X-Sender: p8865914@[149.171.192.3]
To: Mike Hendley
X-Mailer:

Dear Mr. Hendley,

we are currently involved in a research project examining the
kinematics of neck motion in rear-end collisions and the injury mechanisms.
There are two main project components: 1) a development of a finite element
model of a ATD neck, e.g. HYBRID X, which has the necessary biofidelity for
rear-end collision simulations, and 2) biodynamic experiments with isolated
cadaver head-neck specimen. The FE-model will not be an anatomical model,
and it may be possible to derive design critieria from this model for ATD
neck development. At present we have no data which would be of use to you,
but anticipate being in a better position towards the middle of 1995.
Gilchrist and Mills (IRCOBI 1994, p. 81) also described a modified flexible
neck for testing helmets; Tom Gibson was there. I think most designs suffer
from a lack of good baseline biomechanical data.

Our project is being funded by the Motor Accidents Authority and The Roads
and Traffic Authority in N.S.W., and therefore I will have to enquire
regarding confidentiality and intellectual property issues etc.

I hope that we can be of some help.

Yours sincerely,


Andrew McIntosh

Research Assistant, Department of Safety Science
UNSW Sydney NSW 2052 Australia
ph: *61 2 385 5413
fax: *61 2 313 6190



Regards,


Mike Hendley (mhendley@fox.nstn.ca)
-----------------------------------
Biokinetics and Associates Ltd.
2470 Don Reid Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1H 8P5
(613) 736-0384
(613) 736-0990