PDA

View Full Version : Summary of Foot Switch Responses



Mark W. Cornwall
09-20-1996, 03:27 AM
The following is the responses that I got about simple foot switches to use
in gait analysis. I sincerely appreciate everyone who responded. I was
able to find what I wanted and needed. The BIOMCH-L archives were also very
helpful. I should have started there. Thanks again.

=================================================
>There is a company called B&L Electronics in the LosAngeles area that
>manufactures footswitches. I have used them with good results. Hope this
>is helpful.
>
>Ronita L. Cromwell, Ph.D.
>Temple University
>Physical Therapy Department
>3307 N. Broad St.
>Philadelphia, PA 19140
>
>Phone:(215) 707-4871
>Fax: (215) 707-7500
>
>
>
=================================================
>Mark,
>why are you looking to buy a foot switch when you can construct one
>by yourself? Just use one of your force channels.
>************************************************** ******
>
> Nick Stergiou, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor, Biomechanics
> Department of Health, Physical Education & Recreation
> University of Nebraska at Omaha
> Omaha, Nebraska USA 68182
> (402) 554-2670 Phone
> (402) 554-3693 FAX
> Email: stergiou@coe.unomaha.edu
> [http://www.unocoe.unomaha.edu/hper/hper.htm]
>
=================================================
>Dear Mark,
>
>I am also looking for footswitches and was wondering if you would send a
list of replies either to Biomch-L or to me directly. I am looking for a
system with 4 or 5 footswiches per foot, each with a different voltage
change so that on one channel I can get timing of contact of various parts
of the foot.
>
>Thank you,
>
>Stan Ajemian
>McCaig Centre for Joint Injury and Arthritis
>University of Calgary
>stan@mccaig.ucalgary.ca
>
=================================================
>Hi Mark,
>
>Here are a few notes/ideas:
>
>(1) Search on BiomchL archives (I think there is now a Web site with a site
>search function built in) for: foot switches or footswitches
>(2) Motion Analysis Corp. is a manufacturer not on your list that makes
>switches. They are in Santa Rosa, CA
>(3) Accelerometers (e.g. over the tibia) are sometimes a better indicator
>of footstrike or at least shank deceleration. Switches in or on shoes
>sometimes don't go on or off "accurately" or consistently between different
>steps.
>
>Good luck,
>
>Michael
>
>Michael Slavin
>mmslavin@ucdavis.edu
>(w) 916 752-9048; (h) 916 SLUM-ART
>
>
>
============================================
>Dear Mark,
>
>Just in case your reference to Vicon is not Vicon Motion Systems
>(formerly B & L Engineering), I have included a description of our
>footswitches. A picture of a couple of pairs of footswitches is in our
>Web Site in the description of Footswitches.
>
>-Lee Barnes
>
>==================================================
>FOOTSWITCHES
>
>
>Footswitches are used to determine foot/floor contact for gait analysis
>or other biomechanical measurements.
>
>The Footswitches are worn as insoles in the subject's shoes or taped to
>the bottom of bare feet, and indicate the total time each foot is and is
>not bearing weight. Contacts are provided in the Heel, 5th Metatarsal,
>1st Metatarsal, and Great Toe areas to indicate when these areas of the
>foot are bearing weight. The heel section is separated from the
>forefoot section so that one pair of switches can accommodate a range of
>shoe sizes. Each Footswitch has a thin cable with 5 leads (one for each
>switch and common).
>
>The Footswitches come in standard adult sizes such as Mens 7, Mens 9,
>Mens 11 (M-7, M-9, M-11) and Womens 5 and Womens 7 (W-5, W-7). We have
>Childrens sizes 1, 6 and 11, but we ask for an outline of the foot for
>children to make sure the desired size is delivered to the customer.
>
>The Footswitches are durable and will function properly for a long
>period of time.
>
>The materials used in the construction include: closed cell neoprene
>with conductive rubber modules placed in small holes, brass shim
>plates, wires, and black duct tape.
>
>Three choices of connectors are available: 5-pin LEMO, 5-pin DIN, or 5
>leads stripped, tinned and labeled. The 5 leads are: 1 for each switch
>and "common".
>
>The price is $195.00 per pair (any size).
>
=================================================
>Mark:
>
>We've developed our own system here at ASU that incorporates force
>sensing resistors (FSRs) from Interlink Electronics in California.
>We use four sensors, two on each foot - one over the large toe and
>one over the heel. A single lead (telephone wire) comes up from
>each foot to a small junction box that we attach at the waist. An
>umbilical cord then comes from the junction box to the power supply
>and output box. It all runs off of a 9V battery. We can read each
>FSR individually or we can combine two FSRs onto a single output
>channel. I can provide more information if you want.
>
>Phil Martin
>Exercise and Sport Research Institute
>Arizona State University, Tempe AZ 85287-0404
>email: philip.martin@asu.edu
>phone: (602) 965-1023
>fax: (602) 965-8108
>
>
>
===========================================
>Mark,
>
>Have you tried the BTS system out of Italy? They sell a program called
>GAitEMG and have footswitches that come in various sizes.
>
>AnnaLisa Lauer, MA
>
===========================================
>Hi:
>
>We make our own footswitches using a commercially available force sensing
>resistor. We get them from Interlink Electronics, 546 Flynn Rd., Camarillo, CA
>93012 (Phone 805-484-8855). They are 1/2" in diameter, about 1 mm thin, and
>have solder tabs for easy hook-up to lead wires. They're only US$4.00 each,
>fairly durable, and trigger with very little force. We mount ours on a thin
>piece of plastic to keep them flat during use and then put 1/2" shrinkwrap
>around it.
>
>G. Robert Colborne, PhD,
>University of Saskatchewan,
>Canada.
>
>
============================================
>Hi again:
>
>We have our own 9-volt battery-powered EMG beltpack, with 4 inputs for EMG to
>differential amps, and 4 DC channels for footswitches, accelerometers, or any
>other DC-powered transducer. The 9-volt DC current is sent to the foot switch
>along a 4-lead wire or ribbon cable, and you can use each switch independently
>(2 of the leads), or in series using the other two leads to provide a
pattern of
>heel-ball-toe contact-liftoff. Incidentally, we have also found a really good
>connector with nice, protected pins that are easy to insert to the
beltpack, and
>easy to solder to. They are from Hypertronics at 16 Brent Dr., Hudson, MA,
>01749. Part No D01 PB406 MST (Male plug, 4-pin) and D01 EEB406 FST (Female
>chassis-mount, 3 pin). They're about $4.00 each. They also have 3 and 9 pin
>plugs, which we use for EMG leads and umbilicals.
>
>G. Robert Colborne, Ph.D.,
>University of Saskatchewan,
>Canada.
>
>
======================================
>Mark,
>
>You wrote ...
>
>> I am looking into the various options available for the use of foot switches
>> in gait analysis. I am familiar with what Vicon and Noraxon has, but was
>> wondering if anyone knew of others that were commercially available. I
>> would appreciate any information that any of you might have. Thanks!
>
>When I was at ASU last year, Phil Martin and I designed and built
>footswitches for use in his gait studies. He has all the circuits
>etc. and it would be better from a logistics perspective if you could
>deal with him rather than me. If, however, you have no luck with
>Phil, let me know and I will dig up the information you need. By the
>way, we used force sensing resistors (Interlink Electronics) in our
>design.
>
>Cheers,
>
>Rob
>
>
>_____________________
>Robert Neal, PhD
>Department of Human Movement Studies
>The University of Queensland
>QLD, AUSTRALIA
>
>ph 61 7 3365 6240
>FAX 61 7 3365 6877
>EMAIL NEAL@HMS.UQ.OZ.AU
>_____________________________
>
Mark W. Cornwall, PhD, PT, CPed
Gait Research Laboratory
Dept. of Physical Therpay
Northern Arizona University
P.O. Box 15105
Flagstaff, AZ 86011
(520) 523-1606
(520) 523-9289 FAX
Mark.Cornwall@nau.edu