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Rick Ingram
08-01-1997, 06:43 AM
Dynamic Computer Resources, Inc. (DCR), San Dimas, California is a re-seller
of two commercial products/methods for creating Computer Aided Design (CAD)
models from CT or MR data.

The first is called Velocity TM. This program reads the CT or MR data and
allows the user to segment the scan image with filters, radiometric
functions and thresholding tools. Then Velocity TM creates the 3D model and
outputs a digital file (STL) used by various Rapid Prototyping (RP)
machines. These RP machines create a physical model (prototype) of the
anatomical stucture. Depending on the RP machine/process chosen the
prototype may be used for viewing, cutting or testing.

The second process uses Velocity TM to create the initial digital model then
transfers the data to I-DEAS TM. I-DEAS TM is a full function Computer Aided
Design, Engineering and Manufacturing (CAD/CAE/CAM) program. I-DEAS is used
around the world by engineers and designers. With the anatomical data in the
I-DEAS environment you are able to change or create geometry digitally.
Anatomy can be cut, enlarged, mirrored, or used to create perfectly mating
protheses. The digital data can also be used for analysis such as Finite
Element Analysis (FEA), Vibration, Thermal Conduction, and Computational
Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Finally, I-DEAS TM allows for digital manufacturing
such as Computerized Numeric Control (CNC) and Plastics Analysis for
injection molding.

DCR also offers models of various anatomical structures in the above
mentioned formats as well as 3D and 2D IGES, STEP, STL, Nastran, Ansys and
others.

For more information see our internet site at www.primenet.com/~dcr_inc

Yours truely,

Rick Ingram



At 09:46 AM 6/30/97 -0600, Stephen Ferguson wrote:
>Dear Biomech'ers
>
>I am considering different methods to look at the anatomy of a
>hip joint, initially for descriptive purposes, but ultimately for FE
>model generation including soft and hard tissue. Several studies have
>been published for using CT data to reconstruct bone geometry, as well
>as MRI data for soft tissues. Also, there have been several studies
>using photographs of serial cryosections (e.g. Rausching's spine work,
>the Visible Human project) to describe anatomy.
>
>Does anyone have experience with using standard histological techniques
>(fixing, MMA embedding, slicing, staining) for anatomy studies? Of
>course the bone geometry is preserved, but how much shrinkage would one
>expect in the soft tissues of a hip joint (ie. cartilage layers,
>joint capsule, acetabular labrum)? An advantage of using such
>a technique would seem to be the high contrast afforded by
>specific stains that have different chemical interactions with
>the various structures. Also, the image resolution could be much
>higher than with MRI, limited only by the resolution of the imaging
>equipment, such as a digital camera.
>
>Any and all opinions/advice are appreciated.
>Thank you,
>Stephen
>
>--
>Stephen Ferguson
>ASIF Research Institute (0)81 414 2211
>Clavadelerstrasse (0)81 414 2288 (fax)
>CH-7270 Davos Platz stevef@go2indy.ari.ch
>Switzerland http://me.queensu.ca/ferguson/index.html
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Vice President DD DD CC RR RR
Dynamic Computer Resources, Inc. DD DD CC RR RR
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San Dimas, Ca. 91773 DD DD CC RR RR
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E-mail: dcr_inc@primenet.com
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