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Scott Mclean
02-27-1998, 05:13 AM
Greetings:
I regret to report that I did not receive any responses explaining what
"mechanomyography" is. I have received several requests for any
information that I turn up. My limited research efforts have produced the
following information.
It appears that MMG is a technique that originated in the field of
anesthesiology. I believe it uses a piezoelectric transducer attached to
the skin surface to measure muscular responses. Most of what I read
indicated that it is typically used to evaluate the relaxation response of
muscles usually in response to some pharmaceutical treatment. It is often
used in conjunction with a controlled protocol of neuromuscular stimulation.

An excerpt from
Booij LH; Pharm World Sci 1997 Feb;19(1):35-44
Neuromuscular transmission and its pharmacological blockade. Part 3:
Continuous infusion of relaxants and reversal and monitoring of
relaxation.

"Monitoring neuromuscular transmission is an important feature to
determine the effect of relaxant administration or to detect residual
curarization. It is based on stimulation of peripheral nerves with either
single twitch, train of four, tetanic or double burst stimulation. The
evoked response can be quantitated with mechanomyography,
electromyography, or accelerography. The response of the various muscles
to nerve stimulation varies due to the different
characteristics of the muscles. Clinically, the use of the adductor
pollicis muscle is advised."

What originally piqued my interest was two recent articles that have
applied this technology to voluntary, dynamic activities (specifically
cycling). I have provided references below. What these authors have
attempted was to relate (correlate) the MMG signal gathered during dynamic
actvities to other "more traditional" physiological measurements (EMG and
VO2). The results appeared to be positive suggesting that MMG may be a
technology worth further investigation.
Our library does not carry the journals in which the articles/abstracts
that I found are located. Therefore I was unable to gather many of the
specifics on this technology. I am still unclear on the basis of the signal.
If anyone does come across any more information regarding it I'd appreciate
hearing about it.

Other references

Stout JR, Housh TJ, Johnson GO, Evetovich TK, Smith DB; Eur J Appl
Physiol 1997;76(4):363-367
Mechanomyography and oxygen consumption during incremental cycle
ergometry.

Shinohara M, Kouzaki M, Yoshihisa T, Fukunaga T; Eur J Appl Physiol
1997;76(4):314-319
Mechanomyography of the human quadriceps muscle during incremental
cycle ergometry.

Engbaek J; Dan Med Bull 1996 Sep;43(4):301-316
Monitoring of neuromuscular transmission by electromyography during
anaesthesia. A comparison with mechanomyography in cat and man.


Sincerely,

Scott P. McLean, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Health and Human Performance
255 Forker Building
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011
(515) 294-8755 FAX (515) 294-8740
email: smclean@iastate.edu
Scott P. McLean, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Health and Human Performance
255 Forker Building
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011
(515) 294-8755 FAX (515) 294-8740
email: smclean@iastate.edu