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Herman J. Woltring
05-08-1989, 09:06 AM
The following items were taken from the Health Info-Com Network Newsletter
mentioned in earlier issues of BIOMCH-L.

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Medical News, from HICnews 2-15 17 April 1989

DRAIN HELPS STROKE SURGERY:

Inserting a drain into the brain of victims of aneurysmal stroke - stroke
caused by sudden rupturing of blood vessels in the brain - can save victims of
the normally fatal condition, says the Barrow Neurological Institute. The
technique, which relieves pressure that leaking blood exerts on the brain, let
doctors perform surgery on 34 of 54 stroke victims once thought inoperable.


DUCHENNE SCREENING AVAILABLE:

A new genetic test for Duchenne muscular dystrophy soon will be made
available to the general public. Integrated Genetics Inc., said yesterday the
procedure will be able to detect the disease in women and to test if fetuses
have inherited the defect. Cost: $2,700 to $10,000. Most insurance firms will
cover 80% of the cost.

BOYS MORE LIKELY TO GET DISEASE:

Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common form of the disease and
strikes about 1 in 3,300 babies born in the USA. Duchenne muscular dystrophy
causes a steady deterioration of muscles. Boys are far more likely to inherit
the disease than girls.

Medical News, from HICnews 2-16 16 April 1989

ANOREXIC TEENS HAVE WEAK BONES:

Teen girls who suffer from anorexia nervosa severe enough to disrupt
menstrual periods develop weaker bones than women who get it later in life, a
Massachusetts General Hospital study shows. Anorexic adults had bone density
30% lower than normal. But those whose menstruation stopped before age 18 had
even weaker bones -20% weaker than the bones of the older anorexia victims.

STUDY AUTHOR SUGGESTS ESTROGEN:

Dr. Anne Klibanski, senior author of the Massachusetts General Hospital
study on anorexia and bone density, says research points up dangers of the
disorder and suggests further study into the possibility of giving estrogen
supplements to teen-agers who don't have regular menstruation. Estrogen is
essential for building bone mass during adolescence.

COLORS LOWER BIKE MISHAPS:

2 University of Kentucky researchers have found the more outrageous the
color of rider's biking clothes, the less risky the ride. Hot pink may be the
shade of choice, according to a report in the current issue of Hippocrates.
Drivers were given 1/16 of a second to pick out riders who were wearing
different color riding clothes at varying distances.

Medical News, from HICnews 2-17 23 April 1989

LIGHT AEROBICS HAS LESS EFFECT:

Low-impact aerobics may not have much impact on weight loss, two new
studies show. Researchers at Ball State University studied dance classes
teaching low-impact aerobics - exercises in which one foot is kept on the
ground at all times. Exercisers only burned 5-8 calories a minute during the
aerobic portion of the program (exercisers burn 10 or more a minute during
high-impact).

EXPERT - AVOID LIGHT AEROBICS:

Research from Ball State University studying aerobic influences on weight
loss found neither sedentary nor highly fit exercisers lost weight over a 12-
week period, says Mitchell Whaley, an exercise physiologist who conducted the
studies. His advice: shop around and avoid classes in which the exerciser
stays in one place most of the time.

Medical News, from HICnews 2-18 1 May 1989

GENETIC MAP PLANNED:

A genetic map of the human body that will revolutionize medicine and lead
scientists to discovery of the secrets of life could be available in 15 years,
experts said Monday. The $3 billion publicly funded Human Genome - or gene map
- Project will locate on chromosomes of the body's estimated 100,000 genes. So
far, 1,500 human genes have been mapped.

MAP WOULD HELP THE ILL:

A planned gene map would help people with genetic diseases such a Duchenne
muscular dystrophy, cystic fibrosis, Tay-Sachs disease, sickle cell anemia and
hemophilia. It also will be possible to replace defective genes with healthy
ones to treat certain inherited forms of heart disease, diabetes, brain
disorders, cancer, birth defects and possibly aging-related diseases.

ELDERLY GET HIP FRACTURES:

Over 90 percent of all hip fractures happen to people over 70, according to
a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. By 90,
one in three women will have suffered a hip fracture. Reason: osteoporosis, a
common debilitating condition among older women. Patients at risk must be
educated about prevention, researchers say.

SKATEBOARDS DANGEROUS:

Children under age 5 shouldn't use skateboards, the American Academy of
Pediatrics says. Such young children are prone to head injuries because they
have high centers of gravity and often aren't able to break their falls, say
experts writing in the May issue of Pediatrics, out Thursday. They say at
least 36 children died of skateboard injuries in the United States between
1984 and 1987.