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Dr. Nissan Moshe
06-14-1998, 03:29 PM
Shalom again

Some 2 weeks ago I sent the following to the net:
************************************************** *********
Shalom to all netters

We need some urgent help in the following, and could not find anything
useful in the literature available to us.
We are looking into peripheral nerve regenerayion following severe
damage and the effect of various treatments. The model is the sciatic
nerve in rats. I am looking for a simple but reliable and acceptable
method to assess mechanically / visually the recovery. I was trying to
sqeeze the mid-finger while recording the foot movement using video, but

it was too slow (I don't have high speed video). Of course we are
running EMG and histologic tests as well, but the mechanical aspect is
my project.
I wonder if anyone came across any simple solution to this question.
************************************************** ************
Thanks to all those that send me their replies and comments. I got a
number of requests from other interested colleagues, and I hope this
message will get to them.

3 replies suggested the use of compound action potential as a main and
sole test (Sun G. Chung suncg@medicine.snu.ac.kr , Dr. Goss Sampson
M.A.Goss-Sampson@greenwich.ac.uk and Joe Spadaro
spadaroj@hscsyr.edu). We are running this test as I mentioned in my
letter.

Eling de Bruin (debruin@biomech.mat.ethz.ch) suggested the following
thesis:
Modulation of peripheral nerve repair by exercise training and
chronic
stress in the rat. By: Nico van Meeteren Thesis Universiteit
van Utrecht, 1994 ISBN 90-393-0625-7

Eric E. Sabelman, PhD ( sabelman@roses.stanford.edu ) wrote:
The standard method is to measure changes in toe spread and step length;
the 1997 reference below uses the method, while the earlier papers are
on the method itself. There is a parallel evaluation procedure for
peroneal
nerve regeneration which our laboratory at Stanford Univ/Palo Alto VA
Rehabilitation R&D Center has used more often.

M.F. Meek, W.F.A. den Dunnen, H.L. Bartels, P.H. Robinson, J.M.
Schakenraad, "Functional Nerve Recovery After Reconstruction with a
Thin-Walled Biodegradable Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) Nerve
Guide", Univ. Groningen; Dept. Surgery, Almere; Netherlands,m Scanning
Microscopy International, 1997, (published in _Cells and Materials_,
date not known)

de Mendinaceli, L., Freed, W., Wyatt, R. "An index of the functional
condition of rat sciatic nerve based on measurements made from
walking tracks". _Exp. Neurol_ 77: 634-643, 1982.

Dellon, A. L. and S. E. Mackinnon, "Sciatic nerve regeneration in the
rat.
Validity of walking track assessment in the presence of chronic
contractures", _Microsurg_, 10:220-225, 1989.

And that's about it so far. We will be happy to receive any further
information.

Thanks again,

Moshe Nissan
Orthopaedics B'
Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center
ISRAEL




Shalom again

Some 2 weeks ago I sent the following to the net:
************************************************** *********
Shalom to all netters

We need some urgent help in the following, and could not find anything
useful in the literature available to us.
We are looking into peripheral nerve regenerayion following severe
damage and the effect of various treatments.  The model is the
sciatic
nerve in rats.  I am looking for a simple but reliable and acceptable
method to assess mechanically / visually the recovery.  I was
trying to
sqeeze the mid-finger while recording the foot movement using video,
but
it was too slow (I don't have high speed video).  Of course we
are
running EMG and histologic tests as well, but the mechanical aspect
is
my project.
I wonder if anyone came across any simple solution to this question.
************************************************** ************
Thanks to all those that send me their replies and comments. 
I got a number of requests from other interested colleagues, and I hope
this message will get to them.

3 replies suggested the use of compound action potential as a main and
sole test (Sun G. Chung  suncg@medicine.snu.ac.kr ,  Dr. Goss
Sampson  M.A.Goss-Sampson@greenwich.ac.uk  and Joe Spadaro 
spadaroj@hscsyr.edu).  We are running this test as I mentioned in
my letter.

 Eling de Bruin (debruin@biomech.mat.ethz.ch) suggested the following
thesis:
       Modulation of peripheral nerve
repair by exercise training and chronic
        stress in the rat.  
By: Nico van Meeteren   Thesis Universiteit van Utrecht, 1994   
ISBN 90-393-0625-7

Eric E. Sabelman, PhD ( sabelman@roses.stanford.edu ) wrote:
The standard method is to measure changes in toe spread and step
length; the 1997 reference below uses the method, while the earlier papers
are on the method itself.  There is a parallel evaluation procedure
for peroneal
nerve regeneration which our laboratory at Stanford Univ/Palo Alto
VA
Rehabilitation R&D Center has used more often.

M.F. Meek, W.F.A. den Dunnen, H.L. Bartels, P.H. Robinson, J.M.
Schakenraad, "Functional Nerve Recovery After Reconstruction with
a
Thin-Walled Biodegradable Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone)
Nerve
Guide", Univ. Groningen; Dept. Surgery, Almere; Netherlands,m Scanning
Microscopy International, 1997, (published in _Cells and Materials_,
date not known)

de Mendinaceli, L., Freed, W., Wyatt, R. "An index of the functional
condition of rat sciatic nerve based on measurements made from
walking tracks". _Exp. Neurol_ 77: 634-643, 1982.

Dellon, A. L. and S. E. Mackinnon, "Sciatic nerve regeneration in
the rat.
Validity of walking track assessment in the presence of chronic
contractures", _Microsurg_, 10:220-225, 1989.

And that's about it so far.  We will be happy to receive any further
information.

Thanks again,

Moshe Nissan
Orthopaedics B'
Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center
ISRAEL