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Ling Ling (dr)
07-09-1998, 04:46 PM
> Dear Colleagues,
>
> This is a summary of the information sent to me regarding load cell of a
> Biomechanical system.
>
> My question is:
>
> We are going to buy a Material Test System for Biomechanical Testing. We
> think that 10KN Maximum Axial Load and 100Nm Maximum Torsion Load are
> enough. But someone told us 10KN Load Capacity is not enough and
> suggested us to buy one higher.
> Any information about this problem will be very helpful.
>
>
> I have received lots of very useful suggestions and advices. We have
> ordered a 25KN Biomechanical system and a 10KN load cell in case small
> load is needed.
>
> Thanks to all gave me answers.
>
> The answers are:
>
> Dear Ling Ling,
> it would depend on your application. A 10KN load cell is quite
> sufficient for most. You could contact Mr Ashvin Tambyah (874-6521)
> research fellow at NUS and he could help you with this.
>
> Regards,
>
> Barry P Pereira
>
> Hi Ling Ling (Dr):
>
> I suggest to go for at least twice the values mentioned.
> A 100Kg man (and Somo fighters are much heavyer) jumping on one leg can
> easily reach the 10KN you mention at the hips or knees. And we are
> getting torques well over 150Nm in the lower back.
>
> Good luck
>
> Moshe Nissan
>
> What type of testing are you planning to do? How much do you want to
> restrict youself? Send me a note answering these questions and I will
> give
> you a good idea on what to buy. Also, how much are you willing to spend?
>
> Harry Wotton
> Biomedical Engineer
> Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine
>
> I am currently in the process of purchasing a bi-axial load frame. It is
> always difficult to choose the load range. What types of items and testing
> are
> you planning on doing? Now the hard question what potential testing nay
> you be
> doing in the future?
>
> What brand of load frame are you considering?
>
> George Iwanski
> PST
>
> Ling ---
> Just a word of warning. While concentrating on the high end don't
> forget
> about the low end. With most systems the higher in max load capacity you
> go, the smallest distinguishable value also goes up. So if you plan to do
> strickly (bovine) femur you're alright with a ++10KN capacity system, but
> if you want to do soft tissue too, look before you put your money on the
> table.
>
> Vern Houston
> NYUMC/NY VAMC
>
> Dear Ling,
>
> Because you have not said what you plan on testing I can not give any
> advice, however I can tell you that we too, are thinking about a
> biomechanical testing machine. We plan on using it for both small animal
> and human cadavar experiments. We have applied for funds for a 25 kN by
> 100Nm MTS Bionix fatigue testing machine. The 10kN machine is considered
> to small for human bone and implant tests, hence we have gone for the
> larger version.
>
> I guess its a case of getting the strongest machine that you can afford
> and need.
>
> Hope this helps
>
> Julie
>
> Julie Matthews
> Bioengineer
>
> Integrum AB
> Julie.Matthews@Integrum.se
>
> Dear Ling Ling,
>
> It is really depends on what you are going to test. Are you using for
> human
> tissue (hard and soft) testing? Or is there larger animal tissue involved?
> We are an orthopedic biomechanics lab. We have a MTS biaxial system with
> 10KN in axial and 100 Nm in torsional. We found it fits our need. Of
> course, if you have enough budget, bigger system will be nice. It seems
> that you only concern about axial loading. The bigger system means that
> you
> need consider loadcell and pump capacity (I assume you want
> servo-hydraulic). Loadcell can be independent from rest of your system.
> which you can purchase seperately if you like. Let me know if you want to
> discuss more.
>
> Good luck.
> Qi Liu
>
> design >>
>
> If this is the case the the lower load cell should easily fit your needs.
>
> I am currently in early design stages of a Lumbar/Thoracic anterior fusion
> implant. I have decided to go with an MTS BiAxial Bionox System. Currently
> deciding on the which load cell as well. The system will then be used for
> some
> other implant designs such as nails, dynamic hip screws etc. For those
> reasons
> I am leaning toward a higher load cell.
>
> I think the current load cell will meet your needs. Of course depending on
> what other devices, or areas of the body you will be testing you would
> then
> have to do to the larger cell.
>
> Performance and is an issue as well as the lower force cell will be more
> sensitive to changes in the test specimen.
>
> George Iwanski
>
> PST
> 375 River Park Circle
> Marquette MI 49855
> 906-226-9909
>
> Dear Dr. Ling
>
> For most of biomechanical testing what you have should do unless you
> testing strength of titanium based prosthesis. Do keep in mind that
> most biomechanical testing using soft tissues and bone are in the lower
> range of your load cell and a bigger capacity load cell will give you
> noise problems.
>
> Please do not hesistate to contact me if you have any further questions
>
> Deepak Vashishth, PhD
> Bone and Joint Center
> Henry Ford Health systems
> 2799 W. Grand Blvd.
> Detroit, MI 48202
> USA
>
>
>
> Best regards
>
> Ling Ling
> Email: MLing@ntu.edu.sg
> Tel: 7996948
>

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