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Steve Cowin (ccny Of Cuny)
10-17-1998, 08:43 AM
TimesThe International
Centre for Mechanical Sciences


CISM (Centre International des Sciences Mecaniques)


Announces a


BONE CELL AND TISSUE MECHANICS COURSE


July 19-23, 1999


The goal of this course will be to review the entire area of bone cell
and tissue mechanics, with an emphasis on bone remodeling. Besides
being informative, it is planned that the course will function as a
forum for the exchange of data, philosophy, and ideas across
disciplinary divides and so provide further stimulus for a
comprehensive approach to the problems of bone mechanics.


LECTURERS


Professor Elisabeth Burger

Department of Oral Cell Biology

Van der Boechorststraat 7

ACTA-Free University

1081 BT Amsterdam

THE NETHERLANDS

e-mail: EH.Burger.OCB.ACTA@med.vu.nl


Professor Stephen C. Cowin

Department of Mechanical Engineering

The City College of the

City University of New York

New York, NY, 10031

USA

e-mail: scccc@cunyvm.cuny.edu


Professor John Currey

Department of Biology

University of York

York, YO1 5DD

ENGLAND

e-mail: JDC1@UNIX.YORK.AC.UK


Professor Rik Huiskes

Biomechanics Section

Institute of Orthopaedics

University of Nijmegen

P.O. Box 9101

6500 HB Nijmegen

THE NETHERLANDS

e-mail: R.Huiskes@ORTHP.AZN.NL


Professor Allen Goodship

Royal Veterinary College and Institute of Orthopaedics UCL

Royal College Street

London, NW1 OTU

ENGLAND

e-mail: Goodship@rvc.ac.uk


Information and fees for the course may be obtained from:


CENTRO INTERNAZIONALE Dl SCIENZE MECCANICHE

Palazzo del Torso- Piazza Garibaldi, 18

33100 UDINE (ITALY)


Tel.: +39 (432) 248511 - Administration 294795, Fax 248550

e-mail
0000,0000,00FFcism@uniud.it;
http//www.uniud.it/cism/homepage.htm


COURSE DESCRIPTION


Bone mechanics is considered here to include the mechanical behavior
of whole bones as structural elements, the mechanical behavior of bone
tissue as a material, the response of bone cells to mechanical and
electrokinetic stimuli and the physiological significance of the
mechanical behavior. Specialists in orthopaedics, dentistry,
biochemistry and molecular and cellular biology as well as biomechanics
are involved in the bone cell and tissue mechanics. This topic has only
formalized into a distinct discipline in the last twenty years. During
this period the salient mechanical properties of bone have been
determined, but the salient mechanical properties of bone cells are
only now being studied.


Bone remodeling is the primary research area in bone mechanics. Bone
remodeling is a term used to describe the phenomenon of the adaptation
of bone tissue to the character of its customary load bearing. That is
to say, bone changes its shape, its apparent density, and its stiffness
to its environmental load. In engineering terminology, bone is an
optimum composite and the skeletal system is an optimal structure. The
cellular mechanisms that constitute the mechanosensory system in bone
tissue and drive the adaptive remodeling are unknown at the present
time, but there are several promising candidates for the mechanosensory
system.


The subject of bone mechanics is basic to the design of orthopaedic
implanted prostheses such as artificial hips, knees, finger joints,
etc. The engineering design of these orthopaedic appliances is less
than thirty years old and still in a state of evolution. It is a major
manufacturing industry.


The goal of this course will be to review the entire area of bone cell
and tissue mechanics, with an emphasis on bone remodeling. Besides
being informative, it is hoped that the course will function as a forum
for the exchange of data, philosophy, and ideas across disciplinary
divides and so provide further stimulus for a comprehensive approach to
the problems of bone mechanics. We expect an audience as diverse in
background as the lecturers, that is to say spanning the spectrum from
biologists and veterinarians to structural and biomedical engineers.


SUBJECT LIST AND LECTURERS-1999


E. BURGER -ACTA-Free University, Amsterdam

1. Bone histology

2. Bone cells: osteocytes, osteoblasts

3. Bone cells: osteoclasts

4. Bone development

5. Local growth- and differentiation factors in bone.

6. Osteocytes as mechanosensors of bone.

7. Wednesday Q&A


S.C. COWIN -City University of New York

1. Introduction

2. Mechanical and microstructural properties of bone

3. Bone blood supply and bone hydraulics

4. The mechanosensory system in bone

5. Bone remodeling theories

6. Local surface remodeling around implants; influence on global
stability

7. Friday Q&A


J.D. CURREY-University of York, England

1. Form-function relationships in whole bones

2. Structure property-function relationships in bone tissue

3. Organic-mineral interactions in bone mechanics

4. Pre-yield and post-yield behavior in bone

5. Role of microdamage in the mechanical behavior of bone

6. Fatigue, damage and repair and age changes in bone

7. Monday Q&A


A. GOODSHIP - Royal Veterinary College and Institute of Orthopaedics,

University College, London , England

1. Bone modeling and remodeling

2. The dynamics of mechanically related remodeling

3. Functional adaptation in bone tissue

4. Mechanically related responses in bone cells

5. Mechanically related responses in bone cells (con't)

6. Practical applications, osteoporosis, implant design

7. Tuesday Q&A


R. HUISKES-University of Nijmegen

1. Stress analysis of bones and implant structures

2. Micro-structural FE models : stresses and strains in trabeculae

3. The mechanical optimality of bone structures

4. Mechanical effects on osteogenesis and morphogenesis of bone

5. Regulation models for strain-adaptive remodeling

6. Validation of bone remodeling theories

7. Thursday Q&A






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