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David P. Dillard
12-03-1998, 06:17 AM
This message is being passed to this listserv with the permisson
of its author and the knowledge of Michael Salter. I hope some of you
will find this information useful.

Sincerely,
David Dillard
Temple University
(215) 204 - 4584
jwne@astro.temple.edu

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 18:16:38 -0500
From: Michael A Salter
Reply-To: ISPHES - Sport History Scholars List

To: Multiple recipients of list SPORTHIST
Subject: CONFERENCE ON SPORTS AND HUMAN RIGHTS

The following came from NASSServ:


Dear Colleagues and Friends,

I have just received a request from Patrick Earle, who is organizing a
conference in Sydney next September entitled, 'HOW YOU PLAY THE GAME -
SPORTS AND HUMAN RIGHTS'. I have appended a copy of Patrick's letter and
the preliminary program in case you are interested in attending and/or
helping Patrick out with his requests.

I have taken the liberty of forwarding Patrick the names of some of the
people listed above, and, in some cases, a brief description of your
activities. Thus, he might contact some of you for assistance. This looks
like the sort of project that progressive academics, activists, and
policy-workers should get behind. I sure will be going.

Ciao

Jim

-----

Dear Dr McKay,

A number of people kindly recommended that I contact you for your advice in
connection with a proposed international Conference on Human Rights and
Sport in Sydney next year.

The conference is intended to bring together eminent sportspeople, leading
academics working on the sociology of sport, human rights experts and
sporting organizations to address a range of issues in the context of human
rights.

The conference has received endorsements from the New South Wales Minister
for Sport and Recreation, the Sydney Organizing Committee for the Olympic
Games, the Australian Sports Commission and the University of Technology
Sydney. We have received a grant from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Commission and we are hopeful that the Office of the High
Commissioner for Human Rights will send a representative.

The Human Rights Council of Australia is a small but influential domestic
NGO with considerable experience in the organization of such events. Please
refer to our website below if you would like further information on HRCA.

The Conference is provisionally scheduled for Sept 1999 to coincide with
the anniversary of Sydney's successful Olympic bid, and the build-up to the
Olympics. I have attached (as a rich text document) a copy of the
conference proposal which outlines the issues HRCA believes need to be
addressed by such a Conference, a provisional program and further details
on HRCA are available on the website below.

I would be very grateful to receive your advice on the following:

a) whether significant issues are missing from the current proposal and
advice on the issues currently included

b) suggestions for possible keynote speakers or panellists on these
different issues (academics, sports men or women, sports administrators,
human rights activists)

c) possible sources of further funding (we have raised a third of the
estimated $150,000 needed) to enable the widest possible international
participation in the Conference

I realise this is a long list, but would be very grateful for any help you
can offer. Finally of course I wanted to ask tentatively whether you would
be available to participate?

I look forward to hearing from you and thank you in advance for your time,

Patrick Earle

8 Meagher Avenue
Maroubra, Sydney NSW 2035
Australia

Tel/Fax (61 2) 9311 0159
pearles@ozemail.com.au

Human Rights Council of Australia
http://www.ozemail.com.au/~hrca

HOW YOU PLAY THE GAME - SPORTS AND HUMAN RIGHTS:
PROPOSAL FOR A CONFERENCE FOR SYDNEY IN 1999

The Sydney 2000 Olympics will be sports greatest celebration of human
achievement, richness and diversity. In a unique global gathering at the
dawn of the new Millenium over ten thousand athletes from 200 countries
will
compete before an estimated worldwide audience of some three and a half
billion people.

More than ever before sport today is central to human society and
inseparable from human rights. So, as the world marks the Fiftieth
Anniversary of that great human achievement, the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights, the time is right for an exploration of the relationship
between sports and human rights.

SPORTS AND HUMAN RIGHTS - AN OLYMPIC TRADITION

When black American athlete Jesse Owens broke the winners tape in the 1936
Berlin Olympics shattering Hitler's propaganda of German racial
superiority,
he showed the power of the Olympics to advance struggles for human dignity
and human rights. This capacity was recognised in the opening ceremony of
the 1998 Nagano Winter Games with the participation of land mines survivor,
campaigner and athlete Chris Moon as Torch bearer, and the call of Juan
Antonio Samaranch for an Olympics Truce in the Middle-East.

The Olympic Movement took a lead in opposing Apartheid and in welcoming the
new South Africa back into the world sporting community. The Seoul
Olympics
is credited with helping transform South Korea from dictatorship to
democracy.

In the 1968 Mexico games black American athletes on the winners podium made
a powerful statement for civil rights when they raised their clenched fists
in victory. And in the face of tragedy at the 1972 Munich Olympics
athletes
took a brave stand against terror.

The relationship between sports and human rights goes beyond the Olympics.
David Ginola, former French footballer of the year, was chosen to succeed
Princess Diana as figurehead of the international campaign to ban
landmines.
Cathy Freeman's eloquent gesture in holding aloft the Australian and
Aboriginal flags on her lap of honour at the Commonwealth Games expressed
the mood of a nation searching for reconciliation.

The mass protests in Australia and New Zealand against the Springbok tours
in the Apartheid years expressed popular expectations of the contribution
that sports people and institutions can play in respecting, protecting and
promoting human rights.

Today this contribution can be seen in the dusty streets of South Africa
townships, the divided countryside of Burundi and the city streets of Paris
where sport is being used to build tolerance, understanding and respect and
to offer new opportunities to those with few.

THE CONFERENCE - A FIRST

As a contribution to the International Decade of Human Rights Education and
to the Olympic spirit the Human Rights Council of Australia proposes
coordinating the first international conference of its kind on sports and
human rights. The conference will bring together sports men and women
involved in human rights advocacy, or who have survived human rights
breaches, administrators and sports organisations that have contributed
toward human rights and academics involved in the growing field of sports
and ethics, and sports and society.

The Conference will provide a unique forum for discussion and help to
stimulate further work in this area.

THE CONFERENCE PROGRAM

International speakers will be invited to the Conference, which will run
over two and a half days in a major venue in the centre of Sydney. While
the program is still to be finalised the following issues have been
suggested:


The role of team sports in building reconciliation and tolerance:
Experiences from Africa, Europe and Australia

The role of Sportspeople in Human Rights Campaigning/as Advocates for
Change - Australian and International experiences

Issues facing Indigenous Sportsmen and Women: Australia, Canada, Japan,
Latin America

Addressing discrimination in sporting bodies - On the field: Selection
of
teams/individuals Off the field: Participation in Administration and
Management

Sport for All - new technology and level playing fields

Solidarity between sportsmen and women - how can sports people support
those in other countries -the role of professional sporting associations
etc

Drugs and sport - the human rights issues

Opportunities for addressing human rights and for human rights advocacy
around major sporting events - from cooperation to confrontation - from
briefings to boycotts.

Human rights in the sports business - from running shoes to football kits.
What are the responsibilities of sporting firms to their employees? How
can
consumers have a voice?

Sport and the human rights to health and leisure - programs for popular
participation in sport, access to sporting institutions by the poor and
marginalised, the rights of spectators, the role of regulation in
maintaining public access and free to air broadcasts

SUPPORT FOR THE CONFERENCE

Expressions of support for the Conference have already been received from
the Australian Sports Commission, the Reebok Foundation, The Australian
Football League, SOCOG, the NSW State Government and the Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Commission.

THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA

The Human Rights Council of Australia Inc is a private non-government
organization, which promotes understanding of and respect for human rights
for all persons without discrimination through adherence to the
International Bill of Rights and other human rights instruments,
internationally and within Australia. It aims to play a significant
catalytic role - a human rights think tank with a practical approach The
Council was established in 1978 and is affiliated with the International
League of Human Rights and through this association is recognized by the
United Nations. In June 1992 the Council was re-constituted. Since then
it has undertaken projects in a number of areas including Aboriginal
Reconciliation, and the relationship between Human Rights and Development.
It has received funding from the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation, the
Ford Foundation and the European Union. The Human Rights Council of
Australia Inc is incorporated under the Associations Incorporation Act 1984
(N.S.W.) and is a non-profit organization. The membership of the Council
remains small by intention.

For further information contact:
PO Box 841
Marrickville, NSW 2204

Tel/Fax:61 2 9559 2269
Website: http://www.ozemail .com.au/~hrca-agf@peg.apc.org


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Michael A. Salter, PhD
Professor, School of Human Kinetics
University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario
CANADA N9B 3P4

Phone: 519/253-3000 (ext. 2434)
Fax: 519/973-7056
E-mail: msalter@uwindsor.ca
URL:

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