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unknown user
12-13-1998, 10:39 AM
Dear Friends,
Thank you very much to all that you responded to my original posting. The
original posting was as follows:

Dear Friends,
I am trying to help a colleague of mine by gathering information regarding
loads between artificial limbs and the rest of the body. Especially we are
interested in below the knee amputees. We would like to know values of such
loads during locomotion. I will greatly appreciate any help and as usually
I will post a summary of all responses.
Thanks
Nick
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Here are the answers that I received:
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Hi Nick, I saw your post. When I was a student at U. Wash., the
biomechanics professor was collecting data on below-knee amputees during
running. Doris I. Miller. I would imagine that you could find her work by
a medline search.

Amy Tyler
***********************************************
Dear Dr. Stergiou:

Most of the mechanics concerned with loads transmitted through a
transtibial prostheses was done in the late 50's and early 60's. The
work of Charles Radcliffe, Ph.D. UCLA would probably of interest. Most
of his work was done in the 60's. Recent work on the loading mechanics
of lower limb prosthesis has been done at University of Strathclyde in
Glasgow Scotland, particularly with interface pressures within the
socket.
Mr. Stefan Solomonidis, Mr. Bill Spence, and Professor J.P. Paul, faculty
of Strathclyde, are good
contacts for your interest in loading of transtibial prostheses. They have
a WEB page for the
Bioengineering Unit with faculty email addresses.

Good luck with your search. Geza
Sincerely,

Geza F. Kogler, Ph.D
Assistant Professor
Southern Illinois University School of Medicine
Springfield Illinois
Nick:
*********************************
I have performed pressure distribution measurements in
patients with a rotationplasty. We measured plantar and
dorsal pressure patterns inside the prosthesis of 14
patients using the PEDAR system (NOVEL Inc.). The results
were presented at this year's ESB conference in Toulouse
and a MS is in preparation. What kind of information are
you interested in? I could send you the abstract that
can also be found in the proceedings (J Biomech 31 Suppl.
July 1998 page 130) but it does not contain the values.

Ciao,

Dieter...
__________________/\ ________/\ _____________________

\/ \/

Dr. Dieter Rosenbaum

Funktionsbereich Bewegungsanalyse(Motion Analysis Lab)

Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Allgemeine Orthopaedie

Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster

Albert-Schweitzer-Str. 33

D-48129 Muenster, Germany
********************************************
Nick,

Our group at Northwestern has done some work:
http://www.repoc.nwu.edu

You might also check out the work by Joan Sanders
at the University of Washington:
http://weber.u.washington.edu/~jsanders/

and the work by Barb Silver-Thorne at Marquette:
http://www.eng.mu.edu/~bien/silver.htm

I know there are a few others, but none I can think
of now.

Good Luck,
Laura Miller
----------------------------
Laura Miller
Northwestern University Prosthetic Research Lab
e-mail: lamiller@nwu.edu

************************************************** ******************
Nick Stergiou, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Biomechanics and Motor Control
Department of Health, Physical Education & Recreation
University of Nebraska at Omaha
Omaha, Nebraska USA 68182
(402) 554-2670 Phone
(402) 554-3693 FAX
Email: Nick_Stergiou@unomaha.edu
[http://www.unocoe.unomaha.edu/hper/hper.htm]
************************************************** ********************

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