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NYC Bone Seminar 11/28 on BISPHOSPHONATES IN OSTEOGENESISIMPERFECTA

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  • NYC Bone Seminar 11/28 on BISPHOSPHONATES IN OSTEOGENESISIMPERFECTA

    To Bone Researchers in the NYC area:
    The NYC mineralized tissue seminar will have its third
    seminar in its new millennium series on Wednesday night this week
    November 28th. The speaker is Nancy P. Camacho, PhD., Associate
    Scientist, Mineralized Tissue Section, Research Division, Hospital
    for Special Surgery, New York, NY and Visiting Assistant Professor of
    Biomedical Engineering, The City College of the City University of
    New York. She will speak on BISPHOSPHONATES IN OSTEOGENESIS
    IMPERFECTA: ARE WE MAKING BRITTLE BONES MORE BRITTLE? An abstract of
    this talk and a description of her research interests are given
    below. The same information on the other fall seminar speakers is
    posted on www.bonenet.net and will be circulated as the date of each
    seminar approaches.

    Speaker: Nancy P. Camacho, PhD., Associate Scientist, Mineralized
    Tissue Section, Research Division, Hospital for Special Surgery, New
    York, NY

    Title: BISPHOSPHONATES IN OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA: ARE WE MAKING
    BRITTLE BONES MORE BRITTLE?


    Abstract: Recently, bisphosphonates have been proposed as a therapy
    for children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a heritable disease
    characterized by brittle bones and multiple fractures. There have
    also been recent reports of potential negative effects of
    bisphosphonates on bone quality, namely increased microdamage and
    brittleness. In our current studies, we are investigating the effects
    of alendronate on bone quality in an animal model of OI, the oim/oim
    mouse. Femoral three-point bend biomechanical tests combined with
    geometric analysis, infrared imaging and quantitative backscattered
    electron imaging (qBEI) measurements of tissue density have been
    carried out to determine material properties of cortical and
    metaphyseal bone in growing oim/oim and wildtype (+/+) mice treated
    with alendronate for short term studies (8 week period), and long
    term studies (24 weeks). In addition, we have investigated the
    effects of alendronate when given intermittently versus continuously.
    The results of these studies support the theory that alendronate
    treatment is effective in reducing fractures in OI, that continuous
    treatment is more effective than intermittent, and that increased
    tissue mineral density is an important determinant of brittleness in
    both non-treated oim/oim and alendronate-treated wildtype mice bone.
    Further insights into the effects of bisphosphonates on bone
    properties will aid in the determination of the best approach for
    treatment of children such that bone strength and bone quality are
    maximized.

    RESEARCH INTERESTS OF NANCY CAMACHO: Ultrastructure and mechanical
    behavior of bone and cartilage; Spectroscopic imaging of mineral and
    matrix organization in connective tissues; Mineralization
    abnormalities in bone disease; Osteogenesis Imperfecta; Pathologic
    calcification; Effect of therapeutics on fracture healing.

    WHERE AND WHEN: The seminar series is to be held this Fall in room
    3309 at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center (GC)
    on Wednesdays from 7 to 8:30 PM. There will be some socializing
    before the seminar in the GC snack bar on the first floor, besides
    the usual snacks and drinks the 365 Express also carries beer and
    some other alcoholic beverages.

    TRAVEL TO THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK (CUNY) GRADUATE CENTER (GC)

    The Graduate Center (GC) of the City University of New York
    (CUNY) is located in the newly renovated Altman Building at 365 5th
    Avenue. The Altman Building occupies a city block bounded by 35th and
    34th street on the north and south, respectively, and by Madison
    Avenue and 5th Avenue and on the east and west, respectively. The
    Altman Building is catty-corner from the Empire State Building. The
    GC shares this building with the Science Division of the New York
    Public Library and Oxford University Press. The entrance to the GC is
    on 5th Avenue between, and almost equidistant from, East 34th Street
    and East 35th Street.

    The Pennsylvania Station (Amtrak, LLRR and New Jersey
    Transit) is between 31st street and 33rd street on 7th Avenue. Grand
    Central Station (Metro North) is on 42nd Street at Park Avenue. Park
    Avenue is two blocks east of 5th Avenue (Madison is in between). Both
    of these main line stations are short walks from the GC. The PATH
    trains to New Jersey have a station at 34th Street and 6th Avenue.
    There is also a heliport at 34th Street and East river, 6 avenue
    blocks to the east.

    Almost all the Manhattan subway lines have a station on 34th
    Street and within several avenue blocks of the GC. There are a number
    of bus lines that run on 34th street and on 5th Avenue. There are a
    number of parking garages around the GC. There is money to support
    parking for interested students, apply to Steve Cowin
    (scccc@cunyvm.cuny,edu).

    THE LOCATION OF THE BONE SEMINAR ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE GRADUATE CENTER (GC)

    When you enter the GC from 5th Avenue there is a reception
    counter in the center of a reception room and the elevators are
    straight ahead. If you arrive at the GC with a few minutes to spare
    before 7 PM you should consider stopping at the 365 Express on the
    1st floor for sandwiches, snacks and drinks and to socialize with the
    other seminar attendees and the evening's speaker. The 365 Express is
    directly off the GC reception room on the 1st floor (the room you
    entered from the street), off the southeast corner of the room. The
    seminar room is on the 3rd floor (#3309) and accessible by elevator.
    Before you are allowed to walk down the hall to the bank of elevators
    you must identify yourself to the security people. This can be done
    with a CUNY ID or a picture ID (and your signature in a guest book).
    When you get off the elevator on the 3rd floor you head east, then
    north, then east again to arrive at room 3309.

    CLOSING NOTES

    Future seminars are posted on www.bonenet.net, a website dedicated to
    research on the mechanosensory system in bone. (This website is
    operational, but not fully developed and suggestions for further
    development of the site would be appreciated.) You may request a
    reminder for each seminar by sending an email to Steve Cowin
    (scccc@cunyvm.cuny.edu).

    We will welcome your attendance and hope that you will pass along
    this information to interested colleagues. Please direct your
    questions, requests for more information and feedback to me. I thank
    Jonathan Kaufman for enhancing the clarity of this communication.

    Kind regards, Steve Cowin
    --

    ************************************
    For bone research information, visit .
    ************************************
    PREFERRED MAILING ADDRESS
    Stephen C. Cowin
    2166 Broadway
    Apartment 12D
    New York, NY 10024

    Phone (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
    Fax (212) 799-7970 (Office at Home)
    Phone (212) 650-5208 (Work)
    Fax (212) 650-6727 (Work)
    Email

    WORK ADDRESS:
    Stephen C. Cowin
    Director, New York Center for Biomedical Engineering
    School of Engineering
    The City College
    138th Street and Convent Avenue
    New York, NY 10031-9198, U. S. A.
    *************************************

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