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OpenSim Webinar: Individually Tuneable Model of Spasticity & Contracture for CP

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  • OpenSim Webinar: Individually Tuneable Model of Spasticity & Contracture for CP

    The OpenSim Project and the National Center for Simulation in Rehabilitation Research (NCSRR) at Stanford invite you to join our next webinar, featuring Marjolein van der Krogt of the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam and Lynn Bar-On of KU Leuven in Belgium.

    DETAILS
    Title: An Individually Tuneable Model of Spasticity and Contracture in Patients with Cerebral Palsy
    Speakers: Dr. Marjolein van der Krogt of the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam
    Dr. Lynn Bar-On of KU Leuven in Belgium
    Time: Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time
    Registration: https://simtk.webex.com/simtk/onstag...225030&t=a

    DESCRIPTION
    Increased joint resistance is an important phenomenon in patients with cerebral palsy (CP), and is caused by a combination of neural and non-neural components. Spasticity is part of the neural component and is typically defined as velocity-dependent hyperactivity to passive stretch. Contracture can be defined as the non-neural component of hyper-resistance, and is due to increased passive tissue stiffness.

    In this webinar, we present and validate an individually tunable model for hyper-resistance in CP, focusing on the hamstrings muscles. Specifically, we aim to answer the following research questions:

    • To what extent can we explain contracture by altered passive muscle properties?
    • To what extent can we explain spasticity by a (purely) velocity-dependent hyper-activity of the stretch reflex?

    The velocity-dependent spasticity model has been implemented as a plug-in in OpenSim (https://simtk.org/home/spasticitymodel). We will show how this spasticity model can be applied, and how the model parameters as well as the passive muscle properties can be tuned based on slow and fast passive muscle stretches during instrumented spasticity assessment.

    Participation is free, but you must register in advance. We also ask that you join the webinar 5 minutes early to orient yourself to the webinar interface.

    Visit our website for more information and registration. The website also includes links to recordings of past webinars: http://opensim.stanford.edu/support/webinars.html

    The OpenSim Webinar Series is funded by the NIH National Center for Simulation in Rehabilitation Research (NCSRR). Find out more about the NCSRR and the webinar series by visiting our website, http://opensim.stanford.edu.
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