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PhD position on biomechanics of animal locomotion- University of Antwerp (Belgium)

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  • PhD position on biomechanics of animal locomotion- University of Antwerp (Belgium)

    Candidates are invited to apply for a fully funded PhD position in the Functional Morphology Lab at the University of Antwerp (Belgium) under the direction of Dr. Peter Aerts and Dr. Sandra Nauwelaerts. This position is funded through the research council of the university. The project aims at testing hypotheses regarding the evolution of monodactyly in equids (horses, asses, zebras). Monodactyly has occurred in at least four lineages but only the equids survived. This study will start with a full gait analysis (kinematics and kinetics) in extant species to understand the link between motor control (joint torque patterns) and anatomy to further aim at forward analyses of extinct species (using anatomy and torque patterns to predict movement). A comparison between the lineages that went extinct and contemporary ancestors of the equids will reveal whether the pattern of extinction was linked to their locomotor performance.

    Even though the home base of the student will be Belgium, the experimental part of the study will be mostly undertaken in European zoos. The student has to be willing to travel independently for extensive periods of time to collect the data. Previous experience with biomechanics is desired. More details on the profile we are looking for can be found in this link https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/jobs/vacancies/ap/2015bapdocproex183/.

    Interested students can apply online at the university's website http://solliciteren.ua.ac.be/Default.aspx?vid=280554&fac=7&empl=100&type=bap&la ng=en . Dr. Peter Aerts (peter.aerts@uantwerpen.be) and Dr. Sandra Nauwelaerts (sandra.nauwelaerts@uantwerpen.be) can be contacted directly with any questions regarding the position or the project.

    Thanks,
    Sandra Nauwelaerts

  • #2
    Re: PhD position on biomechanics of animal locomotion- University of Antwerp (Belgium

    Some people have reported having problems using the link so I will provide it here again:
    https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/jobs/va...apdocproex183/

    Thanks,
    Sandra


    Originally posted by snauwelaerts21 View Post
    Candidates are invited to apply for a fully funded PhD position in the Functional Morphology Lab at the University of Antwerp (Belgium) under the direction of Dr. Peter Aerts and Dr. Sandra Nauwelaerts. This position is funded through the research council of the university. The project aims at testing hypotheses regarding the evolution of monodactyly in equids (horses, asses, zebras). Monodactyly has occurred in at least four lineages but only the equids survived. This study will start with a full gait analysis (kinematics and kinetics) in extant species to understand the link between motor control (joint torque patterns) and anatomy to further aim at forward analyses of extinct species (using anatomy and torque patterns to predict movement). A comparison between the lineages that went extinct and contemporary ancestors of the equids will reveal whether the pattern of extinction was linked to their locomotor performance.

    Even though the home base of the student will be Belgium, the experimental part of the study will be mostly undertaken in European zoos. The student has to be willing to travel independently for extensive periods of time to collect the data. Previous experience with biomechanics is desired. More details on the profile we are looking for can be found in this link https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/jobs/vacancies/ap/2015bapdocproex183/.

    Interested students can apply online at the university's website http://solliciteren.ua.ac.be/Default.aspx?vid=280554&fac=7&empl=100&type=bap&la ng=en . Dr. Peter Aerts (peter.aerts@uantwerpen.be) and Dr. Sandra Nauwelaerts (sandra.nauwelaerts@uantwerpen.be) can be contacted directly with any questions regarding the position or the project.

    Thanks,
    Sandra Nauwelaerts

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