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  1. #1
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    The evolution of bipedalism

    Just wondered what people thought of the "ground up kinetic " theory of the origins of bipedalism . Basically, what I am saying in this thread on Podiatry Arena (below) is that bipedalism was selected for because of the enormous forces that a biped can develop in a hand held object , by a leg driven , uncoiling action of the body .

    The evolution of bipedalism | Podiatry Arena

    https://podiatryarena.com › Forums › Misc › Podiatry Trivia



    Any thoughts ?
    Last edited by Gerrard Farrell; 11-26-2017 at 04:52 AM.

  2. #2

    Re: The evolution of bipedalism

    An addition to the discussion will be the interesting and cogent issues raised by Prof. Latimer in his article "The Perils of Being Bipedal" which appeared in Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 33, No. 1, January 2005. pp. 3–6. Musa.

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    Re: The evolution of bipedalism

    Hi Musa , many thanks for the note and reference . Professor Latimer does raise some interesting points in his article and for early bipedal apes there would have been many downsides to this phenotype and , in my opinion ,only one very distinct advantage ,tool use , and in particular , high energy kinetic energy tool use . No other animal can summate the forces produced by the entire body as well as we can ,and then deliver them into a hand held object . It defines us physically .
    Last edited by Gerrard Farrell; 11-27-2017 at 09:49 AM.

  4. #4
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    Re: The evolution of bipedalism

    Evolution is always so much clearer in retrospect - I wonder what the future holds for us?
    human-evolution.jpg

  5. #5
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    Re: The evolution of bipedalism

    Great picture, Edmund, but I think the image on the right is wrong: it should be looking down at the smartphone in its hand, oblivious to the fact its about to fall off a cliff!
    Cheers,

    Drew Smith, PhD

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  6. #6
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    Re: The evolution of bipedalism

    Quote Originally Posted by dsmith94 View Post
    Great picture, Edmund, but I think the image on the right is wrong: it should be looking down at the smartphone in its hand, oblivious to the fact its about to fall off a cliff!
    Actually I was thinking more along the lines that the questions in this forum are often more interesting than the answers - which is not to say that the answers are not interesting, it's that the questions make me think much harder. I think that Gerrard makes an excellent argument, although I'm slightly skeptical that evolution is quite so directed ... maybe we evolved to bipedalism simply to escape being another animals lunch? If Gerrard is correct, where does the future lead us since his evolutionary thrust no longer exists in our modern world?

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