A postdoctoral researcher position studying human locomotion is available in the laboratory of Daniel Ferris (https://faculty.eng.ufl.edu/human-ne...cs-laboratory/) at the University of Florida. This position is for an initial one-year appointment, and has the potential to be renewed for an additional three years based on performance. Prof. Ferris has a long history of training professionals who have entered and succeeded in both academic and industry positions.

The postdoctoral research will work on a currently funded NIH project (U01 AG061389) designed to identify neural correlates of mobility impairments in older adults. Research will involve using high-density electroencephalography (EEG) to track changes in electrocortical dynamics in older adults in a longitudinal study. Subjects will walk on a range of terrain surfaces to determine how they compensate for surfaces that challenge their stability. We will determine whether poorer walking performance is associated with the Compensation Related Utilization of Neural Circuits Hypothesis (CRUNCH). CRUNCH is a well-supported model of brain activity patterns that are seen when older individuals perform tasks of increasing complexity. CRUNCH describes the over-recruitment of frontoparietal brain networks that older adults exhibit in comparison to young adults, even at low levels of task complexity. CRUNCH also describes the limited reserve resources available in the older brain. These factors cause older adults to quickly reach a ceiling in brain resources when performing tasks of increasing complexity.

Attributes of UF and Gainesville:

The BME Department is housed in a state-of-the art building that is located in the medical school and steps from engineering. The University of Florida is one of only a few comprehensive universities, having medical, veterinary, dental, nursing, public health, and engineering disciplines all co-localized on the same, contiguous campus. UF is a highly collaborative environment that provides researchers with many opportunities for learning (e.g., top seminar programs, excellent core research facilities) and research collaborations. Gainesville is located in the northern region of Florida, within 1-1.5 hours of each coast, and just 1.5-2 hours to Orlando and Tampa. It is a small to medium-sized city with a low cost of living, excellent public and private schools, and southern hospitality. While Gainesville is widely recognized as the home of the Gators, it is quickly becoming known as a center for innovation and a place with a lifestyle thatís comfortable for families, yet attractive for young professionals. In 2013 the financial website NerdWallet deemed Gainesville the #1 fastest growing US city (http://www.eng.ufl.edu/careers/why-gainesville).

The J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering is one of only a few departments in the nation to be co-localized with a top-ranked medical school, veterinary school and dental school. The department is housed in a new state-of-the-art building (completed in 2010) that is co-located with the medical school and steps from engineering. Biomedical Engineering at UF partners with many local research centers and institutes including the McKnight Brain Institute, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center.

Minimum Qualifications:
Applicants must have a Ph.D. in neuroscience, biomedical engineering, kinesiology or a related biomedical science area. Applicants must have experience with manuscript preparation and submission.

Salary: minimum is $48,000 annually

Days to post: Position is open until filled.

Special Instructions to applicants: In addition to applying online to Careers at UF (https://jobs.ufl.edu/), applicants should send a CV, a brief statement of interest, and contact information for two references to Dr. Ferris at dferris@bme.ufl.edu. Review of applications will start immediately and continue until the position is filled.